GINGERBREAD HOUSE by Eileen Bigland

GINGERBREAD HOUSE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Probably the analogy of The Constant Nymph has been overworked ever since that book set a new high. But here again the comparison is inevitable, and this time warranted, both by the spirit of the story and the method of its telling. Once again there is a Saager Circus type of family; once again a younger daughter who oils the machinery of life, always on the lookout for the emotional values for others, missing them herself. Finally, the piper plays his tune -- and near tragedy comes her way. But she wins a second chance and with it the security and beauty in life of which her fabled gingerbread house is the symbol. From the Riviera to the English countryside to the battlefields of France and the battlefields of commercial London, the stream of the story flows. Rather an enchanting story, with appealing characterization and a popular catch, which might lead to a considerable sale. A first novel, better than most.

Pub Date: July 13th, 1934
Publisher: Appleton-Century