HENRY AND THE RED STRIPES by Eileen Christelow

HENRY AND THE RED STRIPES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Literal nonsense--naturalistically drawn. Young Henry Rabbit paints a picture of rabbits with red stripes; rabbits don't have stripes, say his father and his mother. Retorting ""They can if they want to,"" Henry paints himself with red stripes--which then enable the fox to spot him. Mrs. Fox, however, refuses to cook a rabbit with red stripes (""Perhaps he has a terrible disease""); and when Henry sneezes, she pitches him out . . . to scamper home to his worried parents. Now, he'll only wear stripes in the house. With large-page pictures of the animals and the outdoors: an overworked inanity.

Pub Date: Sept. 20th, 1982
Publisher: Clarion/Houghton Mifflin