ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S A CHOICE OF EVILS by Elana--Ed. Lore

ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S A CHOICE OF EVILS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The most generous Hitchock anthology in quite a while: 34 stories, some dating as far back as 1956, but with solid performances throughout--if no real gems. The 1956 relic is Richard Deming's ""Kill If You Want Me!""--a familiar tale of adultery and spouse-murder in the Double Indemnity tradition. And that same triangle-formula recurs throughout the collection, with the nicest twists coming from the sly Lawrence Block, the coolly amusing Donald Olson, and the clever Link & Levinson team (echoes of their famed Columbo scripts). Donale E. Westlake is a black-comic standout, with the grisly ""Anatomy of an Anatomy."" Jack Ritchie and an atypically terse Edward D. Hoch offer tight, grim prison anecdotes. And the remainder includes competent tales of double-crossing crooks, buried bodies, lethal hitch-hikers, etc.--plus two less formulaic items: Stanley Cohen's ""The Battered Mailbox,"" about the escalating feud between an ordinary home-owner and a local teenage vandal; and Frank Sisk's ""The Standoff,"" in which a bartender allows himself to be held up at regular intervals--because of his romantic attachment (with reservations) to the perennial heister's moll. Look elsewhere for style or brilliance, but this is a large, respectable sampling of workaday, US-style murder and thievery.

Pub Date: Dec. 9th, 1983
Publisher: Dial/Doubleday