BUSINESS LEADERSHIP AND THE NEGRO CRISIS by Eli Ed. Ginzberg

BUSINESS LEADERSHIP AND THE NEGRO CRISIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Professor Ginzberg, Director of Conservation of Human Resources at Columbia University and author/editor of a number of books concerning socio-economic human dilemmas of our times, has put together a panel of black and white spokesmen for this and that to deal with the role American business could play in the Negro urban ""crisis."" Under the determined umbrella-furling of Professor Ginzberg, some areas of agreement come to roost (although there are occasional minority reports). The problems of urban living, long ignored, involve necessary participation of all sectors, including business, which cannot operate in the long run with profit in a chaotic, disruptive environment. Business must be willing to stabilize by paying a price, through financing, planning, hiring, and training practices, by re-thinking its ""charity"" allocation programs. Business must also work with, and pressure local, state and Federal governments in order to achieve urban peace and stability. From the contributors, there are some rather well put directives. Dr. Kenneth Clark's number priority is simply to clean the cities and keep them swept and devermined; Bayard Rustin boosts a ""socialism"" that will fortify capitalism; Dale L. Hiestand has some plain words for business problems with government; Andrew Brimmer urges support of ""ghetto"" entrepreneurs; Carl E. Haugen discourses on short-term financing. However, although there are traces of some hell-for-leather solo performances, the approaches are as wide-ranging and tentative as most hastily assembled products of community planning groups and ""expert"" symposiums such as this one. More possibilities from the old drawing board on an emerging concern.

Pub Date: Nov. 8th, 1968
Publisher: McGraw-Hill