THE DEVIL IN TARTAN by Elisabeth Ogilvie

THE DEVIL IN TARTAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Young grade-school teacher Noel is in Nova Scotia for a summer of research on the Kendrum family--kin of her new 14-year-old stepbrother Robbie, whose late father began the genealogical study. But, while tracking down the truth about the travels of Angus Mor, 18th-century founder of the clan (was he really a Scottish earl?), Noel takes an ESP shortcut: she simply tunes in to the Ghost Hour in Angus' old house (where she's staying), a veritable goblin-fest with the sounds of a fiddle and dancing, an argument, sobbing, the visage of a red-haired woman, and assorted tips from the Other Side. Meanwhile, Noel also observes the goings-on among the present-day Kendrum family on the premises--a large, Ogilvie-style brood whose bad sheep are sour Stuart Kendrum and his motorcyclist son Jamie, whom he's always maligning. So, when someone tries to strangle Noel in the basement, the culprit is no surprise. (But it may give some a fair turn to learn that Noel's rescuer is a phantom.) All together: three murders in the present, some lively yarns from the past, and some friendly ghosts--along with the usual Ogilvie supply of kitchen-table chatter. Silly but comfy.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1980
Publisher: McGraw-Hill