SINGER OF SIX THOUSAND SONGS by Elisabeth P. Myers

SINGER OF SIX THOUSAND SONGS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The readership for this book will be a limited one--it's for those teenagers with a background in Methodist history who want a fuller understanding of the intellectual/political climate that underlay the inception of the denomination. Charles Wesley usually receives less attention than his brother John, the more domineering of the two. Here, major attention is given to Charles' days in Oxford when, with his friends, he formed the group which received the then taunting name of Methodism. Both brothers went to the New World in 1735--John showed an evangelical skill that Charles lacked. With his return to England he began writing hymns, many of which are still widely used. The book indicates the varying influences that all the members of the family had on Methodism. There is a good deal of fictionalized dialogue; otherwise this is a very thorough account.

Pub Date: Sept. 7th, 1965
Publisher: Nelson