NANA STAR AND THE MOONMAN by Elizabeth and Elena Patrice Sills

NANA STAR AND THE MOONMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The man in the moon offers comfort and guidance to a little girl and her star in this simple, illustrated tale of friendship, the second in the Nana Star series.

In a world that is sunny and bright, Nana Star and baby star set off on a journey to return baby star to his celestial home. As the two friends make their way through fields and forests, they are joined by birds, bunnies and bees in a joyous medley of nature. When they grow hungry, Nana Star stops to pick ripe berries to share with her golden protégé. But as the shadows descend, Nana Star becomes fearful of the night–until the man in the moon appears. Moonman gently lights the dark, pointing the pair in the right direction and offering assurances that he will watch over them throughout the evening. This simple story, written by two sisters and illustrated by their mother (Nana Star, 2007, etc.), subtly inspires with a message of unconditional love. Moral values of friendship and trust are encouraged. The authors appeal to emotions common in young children, like fear of the dark, loneliness and homesickness. Adults will find this book appropriate for group and one-on-one readings. Although the story goes into more detail than the first volume of the series, the language remains easy to understand, and the text’s large, black font is surrounded by plenty of white space, which makes for easy reading. Full-page watercolor, marker and ink illustrations contain colorful visual vignettes that add profundity and dimension. The book is also accompanied by an audio CD that incorporates a calming read-along narrative to the story and an original folk song. Educational activities, such as misspelled wordplay, and an invitation to join “Nana Star’s Little Twinkle Club” are appended to the story, along with a web address for a virtual Nana Star community.

Delightful, feel-good book with a positive message.

Pub Date: May 1st, 2008
Program: Kirkus Indie
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