THIS STRANGER, MY SON by Elizabeth Baker

THIS STRANGER, MY SON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When Elizabeth Baker writes at this slightly older age level (cf. Stronger Than Hate, 1969) it's unconscionably close to a walking cliche, however well-meaning, and this is about Marc Ainsworth, with his long hair and old jeans, refusing to go to Yale, giving his allowance to CARE, and organizing a protest march in town. His behavior is all out of synch with his father's ambitions for him: ""Your mother and I joined the country club. . . to give you a chance to meet some nice kids and have some fun"" and they won't include unhappy girls like Tally, plumping for a ""revolution."" Finally Pop can't stand it any more and he takes the clippers and cuts off Marc's hair. Marc leaves home -- for their deserted summer cabin -- Pop comes after him and makes his confession -- ""Maybe I have been too bossy"" -- and they go ice-fishing together. The current scene or just Barbasol soap opera?

Pub Date: Oct. 11th, 1971
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin