While the tiny images will make this a challenge for young babies, the large number of objects to identify means they will...

READ REVIEW

A B SEE

Hundreds of tiny, subtly raised images to study and name make a lovely, tactile alphabet book that can be enjoyed far longer than most ABC books.

Each letter, formed by arranging several embossed pictures of related objects together in the shape of a large block capital, is presented with one line of text according to a simple formula. A creature is doing something with (or to) an item with the same initial letter. So, “Alligator admires an apple.” The alligator and apple are prominent in the letter design, but 33 other “A” items are also embedded in the capital A: accordion, artwork, alarm clock, Africa, anemone, etc. This device is repeated for each letter, with most letters occupying an entire page. D and E, H and I, M and N, and U and V share pages; the already-tiny embedded images are even smaller for those letters; there appears to be no logic to this forcing letters onto shared pages beyond, possibly, a budgetary one. Adding eight more pages would have made for a far more elegant book. All the letters are repeated on a double-page spread at the end of the book. The final six pages list all the objects included in each letter design.

While the tiny images will make this a challenge for young babies, the large number of objects to identify means they will return to it again and again as their vocabularies expand. (Board book. 1-4)

Pub Date: July 21, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-4814-3699-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Sept. 16, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2016

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A happily multisensory exploration.

NOISY FARM

From the My First Touch and Feel Sound Book series

Farm animals make realistic noises as youngsters press embedded tactile features.

“Pat the cow’s back to hear her ‘Moo!’ ” Readers can press the fuzzy, black circle on a Holstein cow to hear its recorded noise. This formula is repeated on each double-page spread, one per farm critter (roosters, piglets, lambs and horses). Using stock photography, several smaller images of the animals appear on the left, and a full-page close-up dominates the right. The final two pages are a review of the five farmyard creatures and include a photo of each as well as a review of their sounds in succession via a touch of a button. While the layout is a little busy, the selection of photos and the tactile elements are nicely diverse. The text is simple enough for little ones, encourages interaction (“Can you baa like a lamb?”) and uses animal-specific vocabulary (fleece; mane). The sister title, Noisy Trucks (978-1-58925-609-5), follows much the same format, but, here, the stars are big rigs, monster trucks, fire trucks, backhoes and cement mixers. While the photos will thrill the vehicle-obsessed, the noises are less distinctive, save the fire truck’s siren. The facts about each type of vehicle provide just enough information: “A fire truck has a loud siren, ladders to climb, and hoses that spray water.” Despite the age recommendation of 3 years and up suggested on the back cover, the construction (with the battery secured by screw behind a plastic panel) looks sturdy and safe enough for younger readers.

A happily multisensory exploration. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-58925-610-1

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Tiger Tales

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2014

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Boynton knows how to please young kids while also entertaining the adults who will inevitably be asked to “read it again.”

YOUR NOSE!

From the Boynton on Board series

A sing-along assurance that this little fox is totally special.

Originally included on Blue Moo, Boynton’s 2007 album of children’s music, this board-book version hits all the right notes. The fact that it lampoons Neal Sedaka’s “Angel Eyes” will no doubt go right over the heads of young children—and possibly even their parents—but they can hear Sedaka himself singing this version via a link on the publisher’s website (noted on the copyright page). That version is slightly longer than the board-book text, but nevertheless, children and adults will happily sing along. Several animals rendered in Boynton’s distinctive style make appearances. Nose-to-nose pairs of rhinos, bears, ducks, pigs, and bunnies accompany the species-inclusive line “everyone can find a way to happiness, I suppose.” But a doting fox and its kit are the book’s main characters. Their expressive eyes make their mutual delight clear, and their noses are very much in evidence. The refrain—“YOUR NOSE!”—is set in a larger font, helping even young children start to recognize the words. This unabashed celebration of this little fox’s uniqueness and the grown-up fox’s unconditional admiration is completely sincere and sure to be appreciated by toddlers.

Boynton knows how to please young kids while also entertaining the adults who will inevitably be asked to “read it again.” (Board book (1-4)

Pub Date: March 31, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5235-1021-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Workman

Review Posted Online: May 3, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more