MY LAST NAME IS GRANDMA by Ella Elliott Colvin

MY LAST NAME IS GRANDMA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Colvin’s debut work is a sweet series of vignettes by a doting grandmother.

In her nonfiction account of the joys of being a grandmother, Colvin tells a series of Chicken Soup for the Soul-esque stories, centering mostly on the learning experiences of her two eldest grandchildren, KeeKee and TraTra. With a clear, readable prose, Colvin shares stories about how her beloved grandchildren interact with one another, solve conflicts and even argue. Colvin, a retired United States Air Force Nurse Corps officer, even learns a few lessons herself. While the book is an easy, feel-good read, it glosses certain significant details. Colvin doesn’t delve into why her grandchildren spend so much time with her and not their respective parents; she also focuses on the two older grandchildren in her brood of six, leaving the reader wondering about the remaining four. But Colvin does share some wise words regarding grandparenting. For one, she admits that she sometimes loves her grandchildren more than her own children. She also brings to light what nearly every grandparent knows but is hard-pressed to explain: Grandchildren really do make you see the world in a whole new light; they bring all the innocent and unbridled love that children do, yet grandchildren involve much less work and worry. Instead, Colvin and her husband can focus on the here and now. Colvin’s descriptions shine throughout, including one tale of spending three weeks with KeeKee and TraTra at her own mother’s house. The group frolicked in the sun, cooked together and generally just basked in generations of family.

While at times a bit saccharine, a worthy, heartfelt effort. 

Pub Date: Nov. 4th, 2011
ISBN: 9781467062213
Page count: 108pp
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Program: Kirkus Indie
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