JOHN JAMES AUDUBON by Ella M. Foshay

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

 Stellar reproductions of Audubon's artwork, complemented by a nimble text from Foshay (former curator of the New-York Historical Society and an authority on Audubon), make this latest addition to Abrams's Library of American Art a treasure. Here can be found early paintings, allowing readers to witness Audubon's artistic development; the superb watercolors, from which the famed prints were made; many of the bird and quadruped prints, from a selection of editions; and a terrific two-page spread illustrating the collaborative process, between Audubon and his background painters, by which many of the lithographs were made. Foshay concentrates, thankfully, on the life of the frontier artist and naturalist rather than on stylistic considerations. Audubon emerges as a self-promoting, flamboyant, haughty teller of tall tales, especially about himself (he ``subscribed to the legend that he was the lost Dauphin of France'')--undoubtedly a crank, but also a visionary whose particular artistic fruits have never seen an equal.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1997
ISBN: 0-8109-1973-7
Page count: 160pp
Publisher: Abrams
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1st, 1997




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