THE SENSE AND NONSENSE OF PROPHECY by Elleen J. Garrett

THE SENSE AND NONSENSE OF PROPHECY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A well-known medium and genuine sensitive defines and analyzes all the various branches of extra-sensory experience and attempts to differentiate between the charlatans, soothsayers and false prophets and the serious workers in psychical research. Chapters are devoted to the different callings -- fortune-telling, crystal gazing, witchcraft and sorcery, mediumship, astrology, numerology, reading tea leaves and cards, palmistry, graphology, cults, prophecy, automatic writing, ouija boards -- with historical background, tricks of the trade and the author's evaluation of the psychic powers involved. Considerable space is given to mediums and cultists, and here the author injects much of her own personal experience, in England in the twenties, -- the embryonic Fascist and Communist cults, the ""masters"" and their rich women followers, the people she has helped and the crackpots who have pursued her and her work in serious research. A sound, popular approach which is readable, sympathetic and presumably authoritative. There is a steady and definable market for this type of book.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1950
Publisher: Creative Age