HAIL, HAIL CAMP TIMBERWOOD by Ellen Conford

HAIL, HAIL CAMP TIMBERWOOD

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In her first summer at camp and her first time away from her parents, 13-year-old Melanie gets over her fear of riding and of putting her face under water; she makes a friend (Sarah) and an enemy (Ricky) among the eight girls in her bunk; she acquires a boyfriend (Steve) who holds her hand often and kisses her goodnight after the dance; and she exchanges her early homesickness for ""campsickness"" and tears upon leaving. The conflict is over Steve's babyish little brother Dougie, also a camper; Mel takes his part but Steve insists he has to stand up for himself. There is a temporary split over Dougie, Ricky moves in on Steve, and Mel agonizes at length with Sarah over whether she should approach him to make up (stand up for herself--like Dougie should!) or have someone else do it. ""Instead of mooning over my parents I was mooning over Steve,"" Mel observes. Conford puts in the usual mess-hall gripes, parents' visiting day, and final awards night (with ""most improved"" badges for Dougie and Mel), but omits the humor and mischief that leaven other, similar camp stories. One more for the campsick, with a little boy-interest to moon over.

Pub Date: Oct. 19th, 1978
Publisher: Little, Brown