HOW TO GET A TEEN-AGE BOY AND WHAT TO DO WITH HIM WHEN YOU GET HIM by Ellen Peck

HOW TO GET A TEEN-AGE BOY AND WHAT TO DO WITH HIM WHEN YOU GET HIM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sorry, Mrs. Robinson, this is for the kids--a departure for a publisher noted for contributions to the singing-bedsprings trade, and it's as pure and square as Harold Teen and Lillums. The first step mind you, in an era of individual thing-doing, is latching onto a ""crowd,"" since a crowd offers support, a ""mass sexual image,"" and protection against a boy going too far sexually. Then there's attention to looks and competent advice on dealing with one's own mug and rigger. As to the subject proper, keep it that way by giving the teen-age boy searching hungrily for ""recognition as a man"" social rather than sexual proof. Flawless advice for middling teens, but sample conversations suggested to achieve this long-range objective might drive the boys to less articulate but more active partners. To the model male's bumbling confession about impotence in civics, our little Mom is encouraged to reply: ""Of course you are (capable) in civics, Jeff! What are you talking about?"" Or guidance-oriented: "". . . you're terrific in math though. Now there's a subject that really fogs me."" Then on to the practicals of finding 'em, researching, dating, and partying them. In all, a perpetuation of the formidable image of the American female as a possession-happy, maternal manager, her harpoon at the ready. But expect a wide circulation and billboard advertising.

Pub Date: Feb. 14th, 1969
Publisher: Geis