MODERN AMERICANS IN SCIENCE AND INVENTION by Elna Yeat
Kirkus Star

MODERN AMERICANS IN SCIENCE AND INVENTION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Frankly, I expected the reading of this to be more or less perfunctory. And I found myself absorbed from first to last. For here, through a succession of biographical chapters, one gets the sense of the adventure of modern science, the human aspects in the story behind the discovery, the excitement of a world where science is constantly opening new doors. This is unique in that the seventeen people selected for inclusion are not the established figures -- Edison, Bell, Marconi and the like. But men, many of them living and working today, who are known not by name, but by the contributions they have made to modern living, in the fields of agriculture, nutrition, public health, aviation, chemistry, physics, plastics, weather control, machine tools, education, etc. etc. Throughout their stories (not life stories but studies of the steps by which they reached their goals), one has a sense of constant battle against prejudice, hostility to change, obstacles such as lack of funds, lack imagination, on the part of others, and so on. Here's a book that should not be limited to boys and girls -- or even adults -- interested already in science and invention, but a book that should help open the eyes of many who think they are not interested, and who will find they are. Occasionally, the style seems too casual, almost colloquial, but the general handling of the material is human, alive, and -- to an unitists -- authentic.

Publisher: Stokes