EUROPE AT SIXES AND SEVENS by Emile Benolt

EUROPE AT SIXES AND SEVENS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An important book dealing with a subject vital to the relationship between the United States and what signs point to as the emerging United Europe. Professor Benoit traces very briefly successive abortive moves toward unity, building towards Benelux, the , and the Coal and Steel Community, and moves on to the initial steps which led to the set up of the Common Market, under the leadership of Spaak, in 1959. Its rapid growth, its potentials, the contribution made to Europe's seemingly sudden emergence- an increase in volume of 15% as against the US 16%, in production of 57% against our 12%, with the goal of a continuing annual growth of 4 to 5%. He discusses- in successive chapters- the basic structure; Common Market as a customs union; as an economic community, involving free movement of labor, capital and enterprise, and shared responsibility; he sketches briefly the international development policies. The British had held aloof, but when the Six bid fare to outstrip them, a rival economic association of the Seven was formed. Only then did the US realize that they could not stay apart and sought accommodation between the two blocs (chiefly as a safeguard). He discusses then the outlook for European unity, the hurdles that must be taken, the Commonwealth preference problem, what to do about the neutrals, and finally the dollar crisis in America- the decline of the gold reserve and the steps taken to bring the economic balance into line- all play their part in the future picture of Atlantic unity and a United Europe as a strong partner of the United States. Much of this is very technical; much too is of broad concern to today's world citizen. Dr. Benoit is a professor at Columbia.

Pub Date: May 29th, 1961
Publisher: Columbia Univ. Press