THE STUBBORN WOOD by Emily Harvin

THE STUBBORN WOOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With much of the graphic fascination of The Snake Pit, and based on the factual evidence of a state investigator, this does for the private, ""financially interested"" asylum what that book did for the state institution. This is the story of Monica, whose nervous breakdown is the cumulative result of Deem's drinking, his women- and a miscarriage, and is used, by Deem, as a convenient way of disposing of her. In a succession of private sanitariums, finally narrowed down to two, Monica experiences all kinds of physical and mental brutalization, is disbelieved by Deem, is drugged before permitted visitors, is denied treatments for her physical injuries which are several. Finally, when Deem no longer wishes to continue the expense of her upkeep, Monica is transferred to a state asylum, and for the first time gets civil, if cursory- attention, and eventually the sympathy of Dr. Gensel. Gensel realizes she is sane and signs her release, although Deem attempts to block it, and Monica returns home to her children- and to the medical and legal prosecution of Deem....Again an indictment of medical (and marital) malpractices, this time motivated by profit, rather than indifference, this provides shock entertainment. Interest in the subject is still intense; it should stimulate the market.

Pub Date: Feb. 7th, 1947
Publisher: Ziff-Davis