THROUGH CHARLEY'S DOOR by Emily Kimbrough

THROUGH CHARLEY'S DOOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Among Miss Kimbrough's reminiscences (all the way from Our Hearts Were Young and Gay to The Innocents from Indiana) this is the special section devoted to her years at Marshall Field's, beginning in 1923. Realizing that Cornelia Otis Skinner's career in theater was not for her, harried by a mother who wanted her daughter to be independent, Emily took a fateful plunge (in a remarkable creation) for an interview for a job in the Advertising Bureau of the big department store. That her father's secretary got her the job, that she muffed and fumbled her early assignments all added up to a tremulous, tentative attempt to be friends with the Buyers, the salespeople and her own department. She added to her vocational vocabulary in humiliation and some humbleness; she learned about deadlines and getting Fashions of the Hour, a magazine for charge customers, into print; she snooped through management organization and merchandise, and geographical, social and class barriers; there were petty skirmishes with the time clock, salary, fads and fashions; -- and there was the discovery of all the ramifications that make up a big, important and energetic store. She even made the grade with Marcella Hahner, of the Book Department, and was alerted as to the problems of poet and toilet, author and goatishness, along with having the worries of the fading of mah jong, moths in the fur display, monkeys with diapers and a magician seen with mirrors. The previous prescription, of the gawk under the would-be self assurance, is again palatable, and an assured audience, particularly in Chicago and at Marshall Field's, should give this a sweeping send-off.

Pub Date: Feb. 13th, 1951
Publisher: Harper