SEVENTEEN BOOK OF ETIQUETTE AND ENTERTAINING by Enid A. Haupt

SEVENTEEN BOOK OF ETIQUETTE AND ENTERTAINING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author hopefully promotes quiet, thoughtful teen-age behavior for all occasions, but even her tone of conversational dignity falters over this repeated point. The eternal cry (and fear) of ""What shall I wear?"" is covered at length for every ort and most guest situations. The word on boys in general is to keep cool, don't freeze and hands off. Of particular value is the section on menu jargon in French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese and Mexican restaurants. Wedding etiquette gets standard coverage with a convenient checklist of who-pays-for-what. On the job courtesy (especially telephone business manners) is explained and sound reasons provided. The baby-sitter's dilemma (""When shall I ask for my money?""- ""What may I touch?"" -- ""What do I say if--?"") is conveniently outlined, again by checklist. The courteous hypocrisy of ""Thank you for everything"" -- even a wretched time -- is emphasized throughout. There is some realistic advice concerning tipping, present giving and date accepting/refusing. The familiar pitfall of what to put in a love letter has been avoided. This was seen without an index which will be all important in determining the book's ultimate use and value -- from cover to cover perusal for even the most earnest girl would be rude expectation.

Pub Date: Feb. 25th, 1963
Publisher: McKay