Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 290)

CARTOONS by Giannalberto Bendazzi
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"A videotape or CD-ROM is the only thing missing from this exhaustive project. (95 color plates, 150 b&w photos)"
This massive history of film animation is inclusive to distraction and makes for awkward prose. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Marvelous reading for hunters, fishers, and naturalists. (8 pages color illustrations, not seen)"
A delightful collection of articles marking the 100th anniversary of one of the country's best and most durable hunting and fishing magazines. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"If only he hadn't felt compelled to include so much of it. (32 pages photos, not seen)"
Neither Brian Wilson nor the rest of the Beach Boys ever come alive in this tedious tale of surfboards, teenyboppers, and cookie-cutter surf music. Read full book review >
ZAPPA by Ben Watson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 25, 1995

"Not one of the new rock criticism's brightest moments."
A self-proclaimed ``Zappographer'' overanalyzes the work of one of modern music's most outrageous iconoclasts. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 11, 1995

"A poignant, insightful work that examines how Americans have viewed their country in the past, and that leaves open the question of how America will define itself without an enemy in the postCold War future."
Freelance writer Engelhardt offers an eloquent obituary for American triumphalism, which died a slow death in the years between US victory in WW II and the Gulf War. Read full book review >

A LIFE IN RAGTIME by Reid Badger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Will appeal to fans of early jazz, African-American history, and 20th-century culture. (30 b&w photos, not seen)"
Badger (American Studies/Univ. of Alabama) restores an important, forgotten chapter in African-American musical history. Read full book review >
IN THESE GIRLS HOPE IS A MUSCLE by Madeleine Blais
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"There might be an insightful book to be written on the subject of girls' basketball, but this isn't it. (First printing of 35,000; author tour)"
A close-up look at the championship season of a girls' high school basketball team that only the team's members and their families will find compelling. Read full book review >
MADAME JAZZ by Leslie Gourse
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Gourse fails the very women to whom she is attempting to pay tribute. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A major disappointment from a well-known authority on jazz. Read full book review >
BEBOP by Thomas Owens
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Bebop lives,'' Owens asserts—but not in this text."
An academic exegesis of the popular jazz form and its musicians. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"An invaluable historical document and the record of a remarkable life."
An intimate memoir of the Negro Leagues by one of its greatest players. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Readers more interested in substance than glamour—and willing to follow their guide through some rocky terrain—will be rewarded."
A thoughtful exploration of the ``deep structure'' similarities between the intellectual graces of music and mathematics. Read full book review >
GUSTAV MAHLER by Henry-Louis de la Grange
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A must-have for music libraries and all but the most superficial Mahler-ites."
Volume two of a contemporary monument in musical biography. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >