Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 291)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The New York subway's modern minstrels are a lyrical subject that here undergoes a lengthy and pedantic scrutiny in a prose devoid of lyricism. (27 b&w photos, not seen)"
A community activist details the culture and conflicts of New York subway music, from bucket-drummers to city bureaucrats. Read full book review >
SPOOK by Dave Henderson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A treasurethe next best thing to a day afield for longtime hunters or newcomers to the sport."
A charming paean to the sport of bird hunting by one of the elder statesmen of the wing-shooting press. Read full book review >

THE CINEMA OF OLIVER STONE by Norman Kagan
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A useful resource, especially as a filmography, but the definitive book on Oliver Stone has yet to be written. (35 film stills, not seen)"
A workmanlike summary of the films and critical reception of one of America's hardest-working and most controversial directors. Read full book review >
ROGERS HORNSBY by Charles C. Alexander
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 27, 1995

"Alexander conveys an impressive wealth of facts, though his narrative seldom jumps off the page; nor does he satisfactorily explain how the game changed during Hornsby's career. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A thorough yet static portrait of one of the most accomplished players of baseball's ``golden age.'' ``I have never been a yes man,'' declared Rogers Hornsby in a 1950 interview, and this statement sums up his character. Read full book review >
WATERLOO DIAMONDS by Richard Panek
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 9, 1995

"Well written, but too much behind-the-scenes and background stuff and not enough baseball."
In a frustrating parallel to the national pastime's recent history, Panek's exhaustive look at the Class A Diamonds' 1992 season spends more time in meeting rooms than in the locker room or on the field. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"A frustrating and disappointing book by someone who knows the game well enough to have done better. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Bodo (Inside Tennis, 1979), who has covered tennis for two decades, reflects on the changes in the game since the Open era began. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Best read for its analysis of the songs; otherwise, little flesh on these bones. (b&w photos, not seen)"
Twice-told tales of two legendary Broadway lyricists. Read full book review >
ANGER by Bill Landis
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Not the definitive biography, but it fills the bill adequately for now. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
A New Yorkbased film critic debuts with this balanced, only occasionally lurid biography of the controversial underground filmmaker and author. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"But it's a compelling tale, nonetheless, told jargon-free."
The inflated title of this readable narrative nicely captures the bloated egos everywhere on a display in the Hollywood of the 1980s. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1995

"You get the feeling the authors don't watch kids who watch TV, but their eloquent defense of public television comes at a crucial time."
A rousing if slightly canned diatribe against commercial children's television, by a former FCC chairman and broadcasting executive. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Almost always a lot of fun, although the lack of a coherent narrative thread means that the welter of names and anecdotes sometimes gets bewildering. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) ($40,000 ad/promo)"
Savvy, though uneven, profile of America's oldest talent agency. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 20, 1995

"Wolfman Jack makes a droll, infectiously enthusiastic raconteur of his own strange career. (4 photo inserts, not seen) (Author tour)"
A jolly anecdotal romp through Wolfman Jack's life as a disc jockey and improbable pop-culture legend. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >