Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 293)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Sublime, with grassy notes."
A disarmingly limpid telling of days spent training horses for the highest levels of competition, from newcomer Menino. Read full book review >
DAVE BARRY IN CYBERSPACE by Dave Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"And it can be read with zero RAM, too. (Author tour)"
User-friendly Barry, tour guide to the world and elsewhere (Dave Barry Does Japan, 1992, etc.), takes a crack at cyberspace and comes up with a loony naturalist's guide to computer geekdom. Read full book review >

COACH by Keith Dunnavant
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 30, 1996

"It's just as well, because they probably aren't there."
Balanced and intelligent, this is the first biography of the legendary University of Alabama football coach since his death early in 1983, written by a contributor to the Birmingham Post-Herald who interviewed Bryant for his high school paper. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 1996

The man behind the popular documentary Roger and Me and the short-lived series TV Nation takes a stab at authorship—and at every conservative sacred cow available. Read full book review >
PERFORMING RITES by Simon Frith
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 15, 1996

A strained and frequently patronizing evaluation of ideological, rhetorical, and sociological elements in popular music. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 12, 1996

"However, in this era of marginal importance, as Goldstein's volume underscores, Ivy League football remains the game's sentimental bastion against creeping professionalism, and a good show besides. (112 photos, not seen)"
A New York Times football writer scores points in this illustrated account of how a major college football conference ``downsized'' to retain its focus on academics. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 11, 1996

"Surefire inspiration for those who are inspired by the Bowdens; not much of anything for anyone else."
Bowden family values rule in this curious mixture of football and inspirational philosophies. Read full book review >
I'LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS! by Art Buchwald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 1996

"Paris never looked better. (First printing of 100,000; $100,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Raconteur Buchwald (Leaving Home, 1993, etc.) checks in with the second installment of his memoirs. Read full book review >
HELLO, HE LIED by Lynda Obst
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 4, 1996

"An up-close chance to meet a tough cookie who loves being a pro—and who probably wouldn't take your calls."
If the Girl Scout troops of Beverly Hills need an illuminating manual for their Fundamentals of Successful Producing merit badge, this is it. Read full book review >
STUDIO AFFAIRS by Vincent Sherman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Golden Age'' have rarely been so illuminatingly and insightfully detailed. (30 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Hollywood reminiscences, and more, from the quintessential studio system director. Read full book review >
TUBE by David E. Fisher
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

Cogent technological exposition combines with Saturday- matinee melodrama to create a nearly moving saga of the many men who wanted singlehandedly to create what one inventor called ``radiovision.'' Beginning with an 1872 experiment on selenium rods that made British engineer Willoughby Smith imagine a system of ``visual telegraphy,'' Scientist David Fisher (Univ. of Miami; The Scariest Place on Earth 1994, etc.) and son, freelance writer Marshall Fisher, chart the scientific progression that culminated with the debut of commercial television programming in 1941. Read full book review >
SWIMMING THE CHANNEL by Sally Friedman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Not much comfort here, but a distinctive portrait of survival."
An unsentimental but ardent record of love and grief, related by a woman who lost her husband only days before she was to swim the English Channel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >