Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 295)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"For the serious reader, this volume of essays will have a decided impact on how the next western is viewed. (56 photos, not seen)"
An insightful if occasionally dry collection of historical and sociological studies by academics demonstrating how whites have portrayed Native Americans in a wide range of media for the last two centuries. Read full book review >
COYOTE V. ACME by Ian Frazier
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"And in the time it takes to read the average book just once, this text can be read over and over again—which is not such a bad idea."
Fresh from a memoir cum family history (Family, 1994), the author returns to the antic form with which he first made his name. Read full book review >

LUSH LIFE by David Hajdu
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"A good idea done right."
Hajdu (an editor at Entertainment Weekly) has found a perfect subject in Strayhorn, a little-studied figure central to jazz history, the composer of such famous Ellington-band pieces as ``Chelsea Bridge,'' ``Lush Life,'' and ``Take the A Train.'' ``Strays'' (also known as ``Swee' Pea''), born in 1915, grew up working-class in Pittsburgh and had high-society aspirations from the start: He wrote an entire Gershwin-like musical revue a year out of high school, full of sophisticated recitative and advanced harmony. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"If we end up in the toxic landfill of History, it won't be because the writers in this witty, wonderfully entertaining collection failed to warn us."
Twenty-two sparkling essays defend the apocalyptic proposition that American culture ``has somehow begun sliding down a long, steep chute into nullity.'' Ever since Allan Bloom unexpectedly hit the bestseller lists in 1988 with his denunciation of cultural and intellectual standards in the US, publishers have cheerfully cultivated his theme. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Although it is the fans of his cinema that will profit most from this collection, any serious student of film should give it a look."
A collection of interviews and essays, many of them never before available in English, from one of the most important postwar Italian filmmakers. Read full book review >

CAUGHT INSIDE by Daniel Duane
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Duane wrestles poetry from the surf's chaos—wild and vital, supple and elegant. (Author tour)"
Duane (Lighting Out, 1994) is a surf hound, doubtless, but he explores a whole lot more than great green rooms of tubular water in this testament to an obsession. Read full book review >
GHOST OF A CHANCE by Peter Duchin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"True to his piano style, it's upbeat and smartly paced—though you get the sense he's dutifully marching you through. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A chatty self-portrait, much of it via press clips and other friends' recollections, of life in the entertainment wing of the Social Register. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Despite the pompous subtitle, a lighthearted look at life inside the one late-night show that takes the world seriously. (TV satellite tour)"
A charming anecdotal account of how a group of ABC execs parlayed an international incident into a news show that redefined late-night television and made little-known anchorman as popular as Johnny Carson. ``The show brought to you by the Ayatollah Khomeini,'' as it was jokingly referred to, Nightline evolved 16 years ago from the series America Held Hostage, ABC's response to their viewers' seemingly insatiable interest in the Iranian hostage crisis. Read full book review >
I WAS RIGHT ON TIME by Buck O'Neil
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"Sweetly self-effacing, O'Neil's grace and charm play almost as well here as they do for the camera. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
The life of former Negro League player and manager O'Neil, whose folksy gentility was so winning in Ken Burns's documentary Baseball. Read full book review >
WHEN THE BOYS CAME BACK by Frederick  Turner
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Turner's writing could be livelier, but baseball fans will enjoy this account of a unique season. (45 b&w photos and drawings, not seen)"
A fresh perspective on the season when premier players such as Joe DiMaggio, Stan Musial, and Bob Feller returned from WW II. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"Interesting reading for golfers and nongolfers alike."
An insightful if occasionally lightweight glimpse at the inner dynamics of the insular world of professional golf. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1996

"An intelligent but sometimes too clever deconstruction of this strange, disquieting aspect of early cinema. (61 b&w photos, not seen)"
Over-argued, under-organized examination of the cultural significance of blackface in American film. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >