Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 296)

ROGERS HORNSBY by Charles C. Alexander
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 27, 1995

"Alexander conveys an impressive wealth of facts, though his narrative seldom jumps off the page; nor does he satisfactorily explain how the game changed during Hornsby's career. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A thorough yet static portrait of one of the most accomplished players of baseball's ``golden age.'' ``I have never been a yes man,'' declared Rogers Hornsby in a 1950 interview, and this statement sums up his character. Read full book review >
WATERLOO DIAMONDS by Richard Panek
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 9, 1995

"Well written, but too much behind-the-scenes and background stuff and not enough baseball."
In a frustrating parallel to the national pastime's recent history, Panek's exhaustive look at the Class A Diamonds' 1992 season spends more time in meeting rooms than in the locker room or on the field. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"A frustrating and disappointing book by someone who knows the game well enough to have done better. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Bodo (Inside Tennis, 1979), who has covered tennis for two decades, reflects on the changes in the game since the Open era began. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Best read for its analysis of the songs; otherwise, little flesh on these bones. (b&w photos, not seen)"
Twice-told tales of two legendary Broadway lyricists. Read full book review >
ANGER by Bill Landis
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Not the definitive biography, but it fills the bill adequately for now. (40 b&w photos, not seen)"
A New Yorkbased film critic debuts with this balanced, only occasionally lurid biography of the controversial underground filmmaker and author. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"But it's a compelling tale, nonetheless, told jargon-free."
The inflated title of this readable narrative nicely captures the bloated egos everywhere on a display in the Hollywood of the 1980s. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 1, 1995

"You get the feeling the authors don't watch kids who watch TV, but their eloquent defense of public television comes at a crucial time."
A rousing if slightly canned diatribe against commercial children's television, by a former FCC chairman and broadcasting executive. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Almost always a lot of fun, although the lack of a coherent narrative thread means that the welter of names and anecdotes sometimes gets bewildering. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) ($40,000 ad/promo)"
Savvy, though uneven, profile of America's oldest talent agency. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 20, 1995

"Wolfman Jack makes a droll, infectiously enthusiastic raconteur of his own strange career. (4 photo inserts, not seen) (Author tour)"
A jolly anecdotal romp through Wolfman Jack's life as a disc jockey and improbable pop-culture legend. Read full book review >
IF YOU LEAVE ME, CAN I COME TOO? by Cynthia Heimel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 16, 1995

"Still, repetitive if taken in large doses. (First printing of 50,000; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Humorist Heimel dishes out more of the same in her latest collection of brief takes on love, life, and relationships (most previously published in Playboy and the Village Voice). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 15, 1995

"An altogether balanced, revealing and enjoyable study."
A meticulous, heartfelt chronicle of a baseball minor league's struggle to return to the game the fun and intimacy that's all too often missing from the major league game. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 1995

"Pretty wonderful, a treasure trove for lovers of music or American social history."
An engrossing panorama of New York concert life in the middle of the last century, when the latest Verdi opera was still a subject of hot debate and America had not yet ``museum-ized'' good music. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >