Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 296)

THE JAZZ SCENE by Eric Hobsbawm
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Podium chat backed by a snare drum's whispering percipience."
Intelligently written and updated study of American jazz first published in Britain 30 years ago (under the pseudonym Francis Newton) by Marxist social historian Hobsbawm (Nations and Nationalism Since 1780, etc.). Read full book review >
THE CITY IN SLANG by Irving Lewis Allen
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"A good read that puts on airs: Allen should have dropped the philology and stuck to his chronicle of the urban scene. (Six halftones, 12 line drawings.)"
A professor goes slumming through the dives and byways of Gotham, Ö la Henry Higgins, to hear what people have to say and to tell us what it means. Read full book review >

STRAVINSKY by Robert Craft
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"But for those with an already established interest in the diverse outpourings of a genius, nearly indispensable. (Illustrations.)"
A brilliant hodgepodge of pieces about the life and art of the 20th century's greatest composer, by his longtime associate and amanuensis. Read full book review >
MUSIC CITY BABYLON by Scott Faragher
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"Straightforward writing, unique anecdotes, and everything you're not supposed to know about the music biz. (Twenty-four pages of photographs—not seen.)"
A Machiavellian manual on what's really happening in the Nashville music industry—including the stars stripped of glitz. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 2, 1992

"Intellectual history at its most stimulating—teeming with insights into American violence, politics, class, and race."
Concluding a trilogy that began with Regeneration Through Violence (1973) and The Fatal Environment (1985), Slotkin (English/Wesleyan Univ.) now offers a subtle and wide-ranging examination how America's fascination with the frontier has affected its culture and politics in this century. Read full book review >

THE LIFE AND LEGEND OF LEADBELLY by Charles Wolfe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 2, 1992

"By deflating the myth, Wolfe and Lornell allow Leadbelly to fill the page with his real and powerful presence. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Definitive life of America's greatest black folk singer, by Wolfe (Mahalia Jackson, 1990) and Lornell (a consultant for the Smithsonian's Leadbelly archives). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Makes the sports pages read like the stock pages. (Twenty-four halftones and thirty-three line illustrations.)"
Despite the promising title, not much dirt—but plenty of dust—arises from this thorough but dull study of the marriage between the two American obsessions of money and sports. Read full book review >
CONJURING by James Randi
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A must for magic-lovers: smart, sassy, and more fun than a hatful of rabbits. (Photographs—115 b&w and 75 color.)"
A history of conjuring that's lively, opinionated, and impeccably well informed—just what you'd expect from the ``Amazing'' Randi, master magician-turned-masterful debunker (Flim- Flam!, 1980, etc.). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"An enjoyable and important contribution to sports history. (Photos—16 pp.—not seen.)"
Like his lively look at the American Basketball Association (Loose Balls, 1990), this freewheeling and informative oral history from Pluto (basketball writer for the Akron Beacon Journal) provides an informal venue for players, coaches, and founders—this time of the National Basketball Association—to tell the story of their league's early years. Read full book review >
MUSIC AND THE MIND by Anthony Storr
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"Readers with their own inchoate reflections on the nature of music will be grateful to have Storr investigating and clarifying their experiences in such elegant, taut prose."
From Oxford psychiatrist Storr (Churchill's Black Dog, 1989, etc.): a lucid and absorbing study of the relationship between music and the human experience. Read full book review >
BLACK AND BLUE by Barry Singer
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"An informed and accessible, if overly detailed, work on an important but neglected figure. (Forty-five photographs—not seen.)"
Singer, a regular contributor to The New Yorker, offers a thoroughly researched life of Andrea Razafkeriefo (1895-1973)- -better known as ``Andy Razaf''—the African-American lyricist whose over 500 song lyrics include ``Ain't Misbehavin' '' and ``Honeysuckle Rose.'' Razaf's career—which he pursued with a variety of collaborators, including Thomas ``Fats'' Waller, Eubie Blake, and James P. and J.C. Johnson—spanned the years of Tin Pan Alley as well as the jazz and swing eras. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 26, 1992

"It's still the same old story..."
Roundup of the usual suspects in the making of Casablanca, by Harmetz (The Making of the Wizard of Oz, 1977), the Hollywood business reporter for the New York Times. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >