Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 296)

STRIKEOUT by William Curran
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Fun and informative, though the slackadaisical writing style eventually proves tiresome. (16 b&w photos, not seen)"
A slow-moving but enjoyable appreciation and history of pitching and pitchers. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"A trip down memory lane that turns out to be a critical dead end."
Former Foreign Affairs editor Hyland sends an uninspired valentine to the music of his youth. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Interesting and informative, but Montgomery's prose often lacks the zest that informs the best nature writing. (6 line drawings, not seen)"
Trekking and fishing what's left of the wilderness of the American West, Montgomery pronounces ``elegies for dead rivers'' but is hopeful for the ``few special trout left'' in the remote, unsullied streams of the high country. Read full book review >
CONVERSATIONS WITH BERNSTEIN by William Burton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"The varying musical opinions are also unenlightening: Foss thinks Bernstein's most serious composition is West Side Story; Diamond argues that West Side Story may well be forgotten, etc. Thin stuff, but undoubtedly grist for some 21st-century scholar's mill."
Yet another addition—though a set of interviews rather than a full bio—to this year's shelf of Lenny B. books. Read full book review >
THE FORBIDDEN BESTSELLERS OF PRE-REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE by Robert Darnton
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"A fascinating, if peculiar, study of the flip side of Enlightenment France's Great Books, though the broader implications are just out of this volume's reach. (Photos, maps, not seen)"
Continuing his expert exploration of 18th-century French publishing and reading, Darnton (Berlin Journal, 1991, etc.) takes on the salacious, seditious, and sociological natures of the potboilers banned and in high demand during the reign of Louis XV. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"A curious footnote, considering the author (who has profiled Woodstock I as well as Bob Dylan) appears to be stuck in 1969."
Spitz attempts to cash in on the 25th anniversary of the New York Knicks' first NBA championship in 1969 in a style that combines the worst elements of rock criticism, celebrity tell-all, and all-sports radio. Read full book review >
AN ANTHROPOLOGIST ON MARS by Oliver Sacks
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 21, 1995

"Readers may come to Sacks's work as voyeurs, but they will leave it with new and profound respect for the endless labyrinth of the human mind."
In seven case histories, Sacks (The Man Who Mistook His Wife Fora Hat, 1985, etc.) once again presents the bizarre both clinically and lyrically, challenging assumptions about the landscape of human reality. Read full book review >
CHANEL by Amy de la Haye
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"Chanel."
This handsomely illustrated history of the work, rather than the life, of couturiere Gabrielle ``Coco'' Chanel (18831971) is more a commercial than a personal biography. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"Intricately detailed and perceptively digressive, Falkner's work is as good as the best books by Donald Honig or Roger Kahn. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Like all fine sports biographies, this one is not merely about an athlete. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 9, 1995

"This deserves wide reading among fans of blues and traditional musical forms. (100 b&w photos)"
A quirky inquiry into the nature of the blues. Read full book review >
MOZART by Maynard Solomon
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 2, 1995

"A splendid book with ramifications for the whole study of Western culture, not just classical music."
Finally, a Mozart biography that evokes a believable portrait of a striving, powerfully creative human being. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Generating more questions than it can answer, this slender, provocative work may play a central role in renewed debate over funding for public television in a Republican-dominated Congress."
Three studies of public affairs television, performed for a media watchdog group, challenge allegations that the medium has a liberal bias. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >