Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 297)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"16 pages illustrations, not seen)."
All-around entertainment veteran Leonard—onetime radio and movie performer, then TV director and producer—recalls his emblematic career in a tough business. Read full book review >
LITTLE RIVERS by Margot Page
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Page adds a touch of light poetry to a genre little known for graceful writing. (12 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
A rare woman in male-dominated waters, Page, editor of The American Fly Fisher, is more interested in ``the light on the water'' than on the size of fish, in ``inspiration, not data.'' Although she was a latecomer to the fishing mania, Page's essays show that her eventual infection was inevitable, given her family heritage and her marriage to Tom Rosenbauer (The Orvis Fly- Fishing Guide, not reviewed). Read full book review >

THE LIVING THEATRE by John Tytell
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Throughout, Tytell uses an acolyte's overheated language to uncritically celebrate a long-gone era in the arts. (Photos, not seen)"
A florid history of the 1960s' best-known radical theater. Read full book review >
CARTOONS by Giannalberto Bendazzi
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"A videotape or CD-ROM is the only thing missing from this exhaustive project. (95 color plates, 150 b&w photos)"
This massive history of film animation is inclusive to distraction and makes for awkward prose. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Marvelous reading for hunters, fishers, and naturalists. (8 pages color illustrations, not seen)"
A delightful collection of articles marking the 100th anniversary of one of the country's best and most durable hunting and fishing magazines. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"If only he hadn't felt compelled to include so much of it. (32 pages photos, not seen)"
Neither Brian Wilson nor the rest of the Beach Boys ever come alive in this tedious tale of surfboards, teenyboppers, and cookie-cutter surf music. Read full book review >
ZAPPA by Ben Watson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 25, 1995

"Not one of the new rock criticism's brightest moments."
A self-proclaimed ``Zappographer'' overanalyzes the work of one of modern music's most outrageous iconoclasts. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 11, 1995

"A poignant, insightful work that examines how Americans have viewed their country in the past, and that leaves open the question of how America will define itself without an enemy in the postCold War future."
Freelance writer Engelhardt offers an eloquent obituary for American triumphalism, which died a slow death in the years between US victory in WW II and the Gulf War. Read full book review >
A LIFE IN RAGTIME by Reid Badger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Will appeal to fans of early jazz, African-American history, and 20th-century culture. (30 b&w photos, not seen)"
Badger (American Studies/Univ. of Alabama) restores an important, forgotten chapter in African-American musical history. Read full book review >
IN THESE GIRLS HOPE IS A MUSCLE by Madeleine Blais
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"There might be an insightful book to be written on the subject of girls' basketball, but this isn't it. (First printing of 35,000; author tour)"
A close-up look at the championship season of a girls' high school basketball team that only the team's members and their families will find compelling. Read full book review >
MADAME JAZZ by Leslie Gourse
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Gourse fails the very women to whom she is attempting to pay tribute. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A major disappointment from a well-known authority on jazz. Read full book review >
BEBOP by Thomas Owens
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Bebop lives,'' Owens asserts—but not in this text."
An academic exegesis of the popular jazz form and its musicians. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >