Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 298)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1995

"That said, it is a useful work that earns a place on the shelf next to Scribner's superb History of the American Cinema series and the pioneering work of film historian Douglas Gomery. (34 b&w photos, not seen)"
Waller (who teaches film and popular culture at the University of Kentucky) uses the movies and their commercial reception in Lexington, Ky., as a lens through which to examine the evolution of the entertainment business in small-city America, and to see how racial divisions affected that development. Read full book review >
PRYOR CONVICTIONS by Richard Pryor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 30, 1995

"This is a powerful autobiography of a talented man who made every effort to ruin his body and his career and lived to tell the tale. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Pryor reflects on a life of humor and hard living altered forever by the recent diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 25, 1995

"Impassioned, but occasionally florid and meandering."
A biography of—and tract on—Moses Fleetwood Walker, baseball's first black big-league star. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 24, 1995

Lighthearted, glib treatment of a momentously crucial subject. Read full book review >
WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IN JAZZ by Barry Kernfeld
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 17, 1995

"Deserves to find a home in academic halls, although less essential for the home bookshelf."
A book-and-CD set introducing jazz to the uninitiated. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 1995

"The bottom line: An outsider's one-dimensional take on a consequential magnate whose achievements require a more accomplished Boswell."
A barely serviceable biography of the billionaire businessman who controls CBS Inc. from a journalist who doesn't quite know what to make of him. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 10, 1995

"Not for every reader, but true Beatles fanatics should find it enormously winning. (16 pages color and b&w photos, not seen)"
The Beatles' producer fondly recalls the recording sessions that resulted in one of the 1960s' cultural landmarks. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 5, 1995

"A wide-ranging and accessible if chaotically organized overview of a volatile field that, for all its glamorous potential, remains a work in progress."
A jam-packed guide to the high-stakes game Maney dubs ``megamedia'': an industry that computer, entertainment, software, and telecommunications enterprises are struggling to define—and dominate. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1995

"A small potpourri, but with more substance than most in this format."
Some interesting exchanges and provocative observations arise from these interviews with nine prominent broadcast journalists and one politician about presidential campaigns. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1995

"Take the rest with a grain of salt."
The former president (Jankowski) and senior vice president (Fuchs) of CBS consider television's future and find the corporate networks in great shape despite cable TV's rise. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1995

"Tedious and tendentious. ($35,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
An overly broad roundup of crimes committed by men, topped off with some partly useful theorizing on what to do about them. Read full book review >
THE STEINWAY SAGA by D.W. Fostle
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1995

"This cavil apart, a gloriously complete chronicle of a dysfunctional dynasty whose renown has long since outlived its actual participation in the music trades."
A bravura history of the House of Steinway, whose name has remained synonymous with fine pianos for well over a century. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >