Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 298)

OVER THE HILLS by David Lamb
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

Astride his trusty Trek 520, Los Angeles Times correspondent Lamb (Stolen Season, 1991, etc.) pedals his way from the Potomac to the Pacific in this entertaining 3,145-mile ramble, which is more cycling manifesto than travelogue. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

An accomplished chronicler of baseball's Negro Leagues (Don't Look Back: Satchel Paige in the Shadows of Baseball, 1994, etc.) attempts to reclaim from myth the true character of a man best known as the ``Black Babe Ruth.'' Between 1928 and 1946, a time that featured such greats as Leroy ``Satchel'' Paige, Judy Johnson, and ``Cool Papa'' Bell, Josh Gibson was possibly black baseball's greatest attraction. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

It's where on the sandlot you, as a kid, first essayed the national pastime that determines your lot in life, according to the comic proponents of the Ryan Theory of Adolescent Development in American Males. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1996

"Recommended for the student of musical-theater history; less vital for the general reader."
This is the complete correspondence of Weill and Lenya, though because she preserved far more of his letters than he did of hers, the book tends to heavily favor Weill's voice. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Baseball cognoscenti will find plenty to chew on here. (24 halftones, not seen)"
An astute examination of how baseball emerged as the national pastime by fostering a pastoral mythology that remained unchallenged until the early 1950s. Read full book review >

THE SIBLING SOCIETY by Robert Bly
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

"Urgent, impassioned, with (potentially) wide appeal, but Bly's myth-patterns jar with his newly adopted news-magazine style of statistics and commentary."
Following Iron John's (1990) mythopoetic men's-movement guide, Bly's new jeremiad turns to broader issues of children and parents, excoriating the modern world as an adolescent culture lacking parental supervision. Read full book review >
HONUS WAGNER by Dennis DeValeria
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1996

"The authors (members of SABR, the Society for American Baseball Research) divulge little, however, in their hagiography about how Wagner changed the game, or vice versa."
A baseball story too good to be true, written in a style that makes it seem even less probable. Read full book review >
TEENAGERS by Grace Palladino
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 24, 1996

"Replete with statistics, first-person accounts, and extensive footnotes, this is the first social history to follow Beaver and Wally's devolution into Beavis and Butt-Head."
A direct, droll, but disturbing social history of American teenagers and their value in the marketplace. Read full book review >
FRANZ LISZT by Alan Walker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 24, 1996

"Thorough, engaging, if slightly rose-colored account of the composer's later years. (15 b&w illustrations)"
Third and final hefty volume on the larger-than-life Romantic composer/pianist (preceded by Franz Liszt: The Virtuoso Years, 18111848, 1983, and Franz Liszt: The Weimar Years, 18481861, 1989). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 23, 1996

"Students of the Information Age will find little new here, but Winograd and Buffa still offer useful points for debate."
When the machines of the information society take over, will the old political machine throw a rod? Read full book review >
BRAM STOKER by Barbara Belford
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 10, 1996

"Belford doesn't manage an answer. (87 photos and illustrations)"
A very, well, anemic account of the life of the man who wrote the ultimate vampire tale, from the biographer of Edwardian novelist Violet Hunt (1990). Read full book review >
THE RANTS by Dennis Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 1996

Talk show host Miller (as in HBO's Dennis Miller Live) reconnoiters the sorry state of the nation with a gathering of raving, raging monologues. ``Now,'' he usually starts, ``I don't want to get off on a rant here,'' whereupon the sage of cable TV walks the walk and talks the talk. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >