Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 298)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1996

"We never get a good feel for Marty as a person, but even at arm's length Hemphill manages to engagingly show the ups and downs and the attendant anxieties of a young man in pursuit of a dream."
A year's chronicle of one player's trials and triumphs in baseball's minor leagues. Read full book review >
I LIVED TO TELL IT ALL by George Jones
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1996

"Introspection is not the guiding force in this rags-to- excesses story. (32 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
The life and times of a hard-livin' good ol' boy. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1996

"Makes a trip to the library seem more rewarding than a session with one's therapist."
Although the title implies a self-help book, this is no pop psychology how-to but an old-fashioned moral essay that speaks of character and values. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1996

"If you rooted for anyone else during the '50s, skip it."
Prince (History/New York Univ.) turns both an academic's and a fan's eye on the great love of his youth, the Brooklyn Dodgers. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1996

"One recital would tell us more about piano playing than a library of books like this one."
Pianist/pedogogue Sherman has mixed together takes on Zen philosophy and modern chaos theory with the meandering literary style of Laurence Sterne and snippets of fortune-cookie wisdom to produce this collection of brief, largely unrelated paragraphs on music, modern society, and piano technique. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1996

"Though her quest for cleverness is occasionally relentless, Tsing Loh is a sharp, earthy observer of an eccentric world."
Humorous anthropology: a collection of Tsing Loh's columns about Southern California in the '90s, reprinted from L.A.'s hip Buzz magazine. Read full book review >
A FEZ OF THE HEART by Jeremy Seal
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 28, 1996

"An adventure firmly predicated on the almost extirpated fez, yet far more than the story of a hat, Seal's book is an unerring pleasure to read."
An intrepid Englishman journeys across the geographic, cultural, and sartorial landscape of Turkey in this wryly trenchant narrative that delivers far more than its title portends. Read full book review >
PIANO LESSONS by Noah Adams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 1996

"Warm and fuzzy reading from a warm and fuzzy guy; just be happy that you don't have to hear him play. (Author tour)"
A report on surviving the midlife crisis while tickling the ivories. Read full book review >
WRIGLEYVILLE by Peter Golenbock
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 4, 1996

"Anecdotally interesting, but Golenbock could have done more legwork in some crucial areas, most notably Banks's outstanding career. (50 b&w photos)"
An okay history of the hapless but beloved Chicago Cubs, a baseball team that hasn't won a World Series since 1908 or played in one since 1945. Read full book review >
FANNY MENDELSSOHN by Françoise Tillard
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"It will take still further scholarship and extended reflection by additional biographers to give us Fanny Mendelssohn in depth, but this is a worthy start. (33 illustrations, not seen)"
An important first stab at the life and works of an underappreciated musical talent. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Highly recommended."
The latest collection of essays by Davis (Outcats, 1990; The History of the Blues, 1995; etc.) finds this gifted jazz critic singing some blues of his own. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Like the films it sometimes analyzes, flashes of brilliance amidst high and low pretentions, pastiche, and pother. (14 b&w photos)"
A passingly intelligent but disjointed critical examination of the gay ``underground'' cinema movement of the 1960s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >