Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 3)

THE SECRET HISTORY OF WONDER WOMAN by Jill Lepore
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"Lepore mines new archival sources to reconstruct Marston's tangled home life and the controversy generated by Wonder Woman. It's an irresistible story, and the author tells it with relish and delight."
The surprising origins of a 20th-century goddess. Read full book review >
DE NIRO by Shawn Levy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"An impressive biography that will surely stand as the definitive De Niro volume."
The life and work of the legendary actor. Read full book review >

CHRISTIANITY IN STAINED GLASS by Lynne Alcott Kogel
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A striking volume of remarkable art and informative commentary."
Kogel documents the extensive stained glass of Michigan's Grosse Pointe Memorial Church in her debut photography book. Read full book review >
EVEN <i>THIS</i> I GET TO EXPERIENCE by Norman Lear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A big-hearted, richly detailed chronicle of comedy, commitment and a long life lived fully."
A TV titan on his memorable life and storied career. Read full book review >
TINSELTOWN by William J. Mann
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"While searching for a solution to the sensational crime, Mann masterfully captures the zeitgeist of Hollywood in its early days."
Who killed William Desmond Taylor? More than 90 years after the unsolved murder of the renowned director, film historian and biographer Mann (Hello Gorgeous: Becoming Barbra Streisand, 2012, etc.) takes up the cold case. Read full book review >

SCRIBE by Bob Ryan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A terrific memoir with lessons for young journalists, sports fans and anyone who shares the love of the games."
The classic American sportswriter reflects on a half-century of covering the games we play. Read full book review >
NOT MY FATHER'S SON by Alan Cumming
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A raw, revealing memoir from a courageous actor and writer."
The award-winning actor uncovers his family's darkest secret. Read full book review >
THE ART OF NOISE by Daniel Rachel
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A splendid treat for music aficionados."
Interviews with more than two dozen leading British rock and pop songwriters. Read full book review >
BREAKFAST AT SOTHEBY'S by Philip Hook
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 2, 2014

"A winner. Readers will learn more about the modern art market in this simple book than in any college course."
Hook (The Ultimate Trophy: How the Impressionist Painting Conquered the World, 2009, etc.) uses his years of experience to explain why paintings succeed or fail. Read full book review >
BOY ON ICE by John Branch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A sad, tragic story that underscores the high human cost of violent entertainment."
Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Branch debuts with a biography of hockey player Derek Boogaard (1982-2011), a fierce fighter on the ice who died of an overdose of alcohol and prescription painkillers at the age of 28. Read full book review >
THE SENSE OF STYLE by Steven Pinker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Fatter and more complex than Strunk and White, and some of the more technical arguments may make this a tough sell on the first-year comp front. Still, Pinker's vade mecum is a worthy addition to any writer's library."
Yet another how-to book on writing? Indeed, but this is one of the best to come along in many years, a model of intelligent signposting and syntactical comportment. Read full book review >
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL by Ellen T. Harris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"Musical in structure, tone and emotional effect."
An author of scholarly works about George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) returns with a more general work about the prolific composer and his milieu. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >