Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 3)

THE BUTLER'S CHILD by Lewis M. Steel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"An articulate, emotionally moving chronicle of a life informed by racial unrest and elevated with dutiful humanitarianism."
A white man borne of privilege dedicates his life to the defense of civil rights. Read full book review >
HUSTLING HITLER by Walter Shapiro
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"An intermittently interesting look at a character who was undoubtedly raw material for Ring Lardner and Damon Runyon. "
The tale of Freeman Bernstein, a Broadway grifter who scammed Nazi officials on the eve of World War II. Read full book review >

BUT WHAT IF WE'RE WRONG? by Chuck Klosterman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 7, 2016

"Replete with lots of nifty, whimsical footnotes, this clever, speculative book challenges our beliefs with jocularity and perspicacity."
An inquiry into why we'll probably be wrong about almost everything. Read full book review >
NEVER A DULL MOMENT by David Hepworth
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 7, 2016

"An exuberant tour through a pivotal year in the development of popular music and culture."
The longtime music journalist and founder of Mojo and Q delivers a month-by-month breakdown of the year that changed pop music history. Read full book review >
RUNNING WITH THE CHAMP by Tim Shanahan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"If you're wondering why Ali is called 'The Greatest,' this unchallenging but pleasant memoir makes for a good place to start."
An affectionate portrait of boxing legend Muhammad Ali. Read full book review >

MAGIC AND LOSS by Virginia Heffernan
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 7, 2016

"A thoroughly engrossing examination of the Internet's past, present, and future."
New York Times Magazine writer Heffernan considers the mighty Internet in all its terrible beauty and power. Read full book review >
BLACK MAN, WHITE HOUSE by D.L. Hughley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Funny, insightful, and legitimately illuminating."
The Obama years, through a glass cleverly. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"First-rate reporting and a seminar in how to employ context in investigative and historical journalism."
A veteran journalist uses a variety of lenses to illuminate the dark story of the Black Legion, an association of murderous (white) domestic terrorists who briefly thrived in the upper Midwest. Read full book review >
THE DIVINE MADNESS OF PHILIP K. DICK by Kyle Arnold
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"An inquiry into the SF master's mind that will interest only the most devoted of Dick's fans."
Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) sits on the couch for some deep analysis. Read full book review >
SWEET DREAMS AND FLYING MACHINES by Mark Ribowsky
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"Just another in the onslaught of rock bios and memoirs—a disappointing follow-up to the author's excellent Dreams to Remember."
A biography that confirms both the best and the worst that fans have heard about the archetypal 1970s singer/songwriter. Read full book review >
SOBER STICK FIGURE by Amber Tozer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"The urgency and desperation of addiction told through crisp, biting sarcasm and self-deprecating humor."
A stand-up comedian reclaims her life after three decades of alcohol abuse. Read full book review >
DODGERLAND by Michael Fallon
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"Not a conventional championship-season kind of treatment but a thoughtful, comprehensive, and even deeply personal account of a boisterous era whose echoes remain loud, even painful."
The late-1970s Los Angeles Dodgers are a not-so-distant window through which we can view American culture, then and now. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >