Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 301)

HITTER by Ed Linn
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"An unsentimental appraisal that succeeds in giving human dimensions to a baseball legend and in putting fresh luster on his fabled achievements. (Photographs—not seen.)"
An unusually thoughtful sports bio that puts the accomplishments and contentious nature of Ted Williams into clear perspective. Read full book review >
THE LAND WHERE THE BLUES BEGAN by Alan Lomax
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"The devil's own music gets its due. (Photos—16 pp. b&w—not seen.)"
Singingly well-written cornbread-and-moonshine odyssey of folk-archivist Lomax's second swing through the Mississippi Delta in search of seminal blues songs and players, this time during early WW II. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Enough for a game perhaps, but far short of set or match. (Eight-page photo insert.)"
A decade after his account of life on the men's tour (Short Circuit, 1983), journalist/novelist Mewshaw (True Crime, 1991, etc.) turns his attention to the women's game—in a frequently insightful, but surprisingly tepid, chronicle of the 1992 season. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"A fine and revealing report on economic man at work and play on a field of dreams."
Assuming that Bismarck was correct in his judgment that citizens should not see how either their sausages or laws are made, baseball fans might be well advised to eschew reports like the absorbing one at hand—which documents the many ways in which the national pastime is, at the major-league level, more a commercial venture than a sport. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Gracelessly written but stimulating study that could induce TV critics—and addicts—to redefine the meaning and impact of the medium in their lives."
In an impassioned rebuttal to those who complain that TV enslaves millions of zombielike viewers, freelancer Davis (Newsweek, Vanity Fair, etc.) argues that we neither passively receive—nor are much influenced by—our changing and complex TV technology. Read full book review >

SERIOUS FUN by Robert Edelman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"An informed and informative appraisal of what the Western sports community once viewed as the Big Red Machine. (Twenty halftones—some seen)"
An agreeable and enlightening overview of spectator sports in the Soviet Union from the 1917 revolution through Communism's collapse. Read full book review >
MY MOTHER WORKED AND I TURNED OUT OKAY by Katherine Goldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1993

"Celebrating the resilience of children and their parents: a cheerful antidote to those who rail against working mothers."
A lighthearted but not empty-headed look at adult children of working mothers. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Doubtless, experts will accuse the author of overstatement and will find exceptions and countercurrents; but, overall, his discussion is lively and stimulating."
Music in relation to science is a theme that James has explored in popular articles (Discover, etc.). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Marvelous. (Photographs—not seen)"
Likable, well-told autobiography of the world's greatest pocket billiards player, full of superb billiard lore and tales of giants of the cue. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Brings a fresh sense of fun to otherwise well-trod fairways."
A lighthearted, breezy look at two very different games of golf: the one that's played by the pros on PGA tours, and ``the Hacker's Game'' that's played by almost everyone else. Read full book review >
CULTURE OF COMPLAINT by Robert Hughes
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1993

"Not since John Gardner's On Moral Fiction (1978) have we had such a pellet-gun shower of right-wing leftism, back-to-basics positivism—and like Gardner's, it settles down more as vanitas than veritas."
It's hard not to be stirred up and entertained by the three jeremiad-essays Hughes (Barcelona, 1992, etc.) offers here. Read full book review >
OK! by Max Wilk
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 31, 1993

"Despite a melodramatic presentation, Wilk's enthusiasm makes this an entertaining read—a nostalgia trip for some and an important piece of stage history for others. (Color and b&w photographs throughout—most seen.)"
The trail-blazing musical that launched the prolific partnership of Rodgers and Hammerstein celebrates its 50th anniversary with members of the original production helping Wilk (And Did You Once See Sidney Plain?, 1986, etc.) piece together a colorful history of its evolution as the first Broadway musical drama to weld music, book, song, and dance into an integrated whole. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jenny Han
July 6, 2015

In Jenny Han’s P.S. I Still Love You, Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? In this charming and heartfelt sequel to the New York Times bestseller To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, we see first love through the eyes of the unforgettable Lara Jean. Love is never easy, but maybe that’s part of makes it so amazing. View video >