Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 301)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 11, 1995

"A poignant, insightful work that examines how Americans have viewed their country in the past, and that leaves open the question of how America will define itself without an enemy in the postCold War future."
Freelance writer Engelhardt offers an eloquent obituary for American triumphalism, which died a slow death in the years between US victory in WW II and the Gulf War. Read full book review >
A LIFE IN RAGTIME by Reid Badger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Will appeal to fans of early jazz, African-American history, and 20th-century culture. (30 b&w photos, not seen)"
Badger (American Studies/Univ. of Alabama) restores an important, forgotten chapter in African-American musical history. Read full book review >

IN THESE GIRLS HOPE IS A MUSCLE by Madeleine Blais
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"There might be an insightful book to be written on the subject of girls' basketball, but this isn't it. (First printing of 35,000; author tour)"
A close-up look at the championship season of a girls' high school basketball team that only the team's members and their families will find compelling. Read full book review >
MADAME JAZZ by Leslie Gourse
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Gourse fails the very women to whom she is attempting to pay tribute. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A major disappointment from a well-known authority on jazz. Read full book review >
BEBOP by Thomas Owens
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Bebop lives,'' Owens asserts—but not in this text."
An academic exegesis of the popular jazz form and its musicians. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"An invaluable historical document and the record of a remarkable life."
An intimate memoir of the Negro Leagues by one of its greatest players. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Readers more interested in substance than glamour—and willing to follow their guide through some rocky terrain—will be rewarded."
A thoughtful exploration of the ``deep structure'' similarities between the intellectual graces of music and mathematics. Read full book review >
GUSTAV MAHLER by Henry-Louis de la Grange
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A must-have for music libraries and all but the most superficial Mahler-ites."
Volume two of a contemporary monument in musical biography. Read full book review >
THE SPONSORED LIFE by Leslie Savan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Though inevitably such a collection is sometimes redundant, this is an indispensable guide for anyone who wants to better understand how advertising presses our buttons while convincing us that we are in control. (Photos, not seen)"
Almost as funny as it is infuriating, this is an impressive collection of pieces about the impact of advertising on American society. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Marsalis is a lot more appealing when he gets off his soapbox and concentrates on extolling (with considerable eloquence) the music he loves."
Marsalis writes as elegantly as he plays the trumpet, so fans will doubtless enjoy his atmospheric musings on playing jazz across America, nicely complemented by photographer/filmmaker Stewart's glamorously black-and-white photos. Read full book review >
SLIGHTLY FOXED--BUT STILL DESIRABLE by Ronald Searle
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

Satirical artist, cartoonist, and wit Searle is also, alas for him, a bibliophile. Read full book review >
BOB MARLEY by Bruce W. Talamon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"As a result, they not only are more interesting but also convey more powerfully a sense of Marley's genuine charisma."
Talamon's duotone photographs capture Jamaican reggae star Bob Marley (194581) with a rough humanity that comes as a relief after Steffens's hagiographic text. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >