Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 303)

STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN by Richard Cole
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 3, 1992

"Lacks the depth of Stephen Davis's Hammer of the Gods (1985) but dishes up the real dirt as only an insider's report can. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Tell-all journal of the hedonism, profligacy, and perversity of the Seventies supergroup that went down in flames. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Fine when Beard stays on the golf course; preachy and self- indulgent when he doesn't."
Winner of 11 PGA tournaments between 1963 and 1971, Beard, whose golf game and life later ``went to pieces'' because of alcoholism, joined the money-rich Senior Tour in 1989. Read full book review >

WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IN MOZART by Robert Harris
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Mozart's Top Fifty works'': an only sporadically effective music-appreciation class—often too dense for beginners, too spoon-fed for serious music-lovers."
Harris, head of variety programming for CBS radio, tries hard- -with very iffy results—to provide unsophisticated listeners with an in-depth introduction to Mozart's life and work. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 27, 1992

"Vintage Capstick."
Veteran hunter-writer Capstick (Sands of Silence, 1991, etc.) offers what he calls ``escape reading'' as he tells—in his typical men-will-be-boys way—the stories of four hunters. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 20, 1992

"Sullivan offers intelligent advice, but only team owners and managers need take time out to listen. (Eight pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
Nine innings' worth of baseball as Big Business, by Sullivan (The Minors, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 15, 1992

Traditional writing on Charles Ives, beginning with Henry and Sidney Cowell's slight 1955 biography, offers a sunny, straightforward view of the composer's creative legacy from his eccentric bandmaster father. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 6, 1992

"Not quite a world-beater—and a bit of a downer for an Olympic year—but worth the attention of anyone serious about the future of humanity in the sporting arena and beyond."
An ambitious and jolting, if occasionally turgid, investigation into the origins and wider implications of the contemporary union of science and sport. Read full book review >
SHOELESS JOE AND RAGTIME BASEBALL by Harvey Frommer
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

Another peek at baseball's good old days—or, in this case, bad old days—by veteran sports-historian Frommer (Growing Up at Bat, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1992

"An amusing entry that's as easy to digest, and about as nourishing, as a bottle of designer mineral water. (Illustrations.)"
Stand-up comic Rudner sits down to produce a collection of light little essays. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

"Sampson fails to reach the authority and quality achieved by Michael Bamberger in To the Linksland (reviewed above), but his book has obvious appeal for golf-history and nostalgia buffs. (Sixteen-page b&w photo insert—not seen.)"
While it's arguable that 1960—as golf-pro turned golf-writer Sampson claims—was the watershed year for professional golf, it does offer a springboard for an interesting if slipshod study of golfing greats Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Ben Hogan at contrasting stages of their careers. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

The title (a nominee for dullest of the year) refers to the day that Big Ed Delahanty, a heavy-drinking, heavy-hitting baseball superstar, tumbled down Niagara Falls to his death. Read full book review >
TO THE LINKSLAND by Michael Bamberger
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

"Bamberger's course histories and profiles of legends from Old Tom Morris to today's Seve Ballesteros evoke a flavor and nostalgia that further deepen this lyrical and inspired work, a far better choice for golfing enthusiasts than Curt Sampson's The Eternal Summer (reviewed below)."
Bamberger, a Philadelphia Inquirer sportswriter, spent 1991 caddying on the European professional golf tour and playing the ``linksland,'' Scotland's legendary array of courses. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >