Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 303)

BEYOND CENTER COURT by Tracy Austin
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 17, 1992

"A weak net-ball of a book, best reserved for tennis fanatics looking for something to thumb through during changeovers. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Strikingly bland memoirs from the former teen tennis-phenom. Read full book review >
STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN by Richard Cole
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 3, 1992

"Lacks the depth of Stephen Davis's Hammer of the Gods (1985) but dishes up the real dirt as only an insider's report can. (Photographs—not seen.)"
Tell-all journal of the hedonism, profligacy, and perversity of the Seventies supergroup that went down in flames. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Fine when Beard stays on the golf course; preachy and self- indulgent when he doesn't."
Winner of 11 PGA tournaments between 1963 and 1971, Beard, whose golf game and life later ``went to pieces'' because of alcoholism, joined the money-rich Senior Tour in 1989. Read full book review >
WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IN MOZART by Robert Harris
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Mozart's Top Fifty works'': an only sporadically effective music-appreciation class—often too dense for beginners, too spoon-fed for serious music-lovers."
Harris, head of variety programming for CBS radio, tries hard- -with very iffy results—to provide unsophisticated listeners with an in-depth introduction to Mozart's life and work. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 27, 1992

"Vintage Capstick."
Veteran hunter-writer Capstick (Sands of Silence, 1991, etc.) offers what he calls ``escape reading'' as he tells—in his typical men-will-be-boys way—the stories of four hunters. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 20, 1992

"Sullivan offers intelligent advice, but only team owners and managers need take time out to listen. (Eight pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
Nine innings' worth of baseball as Big Business, by Sullivan (The Minors, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 15, 1992

Traditional writing on Charles Ives, beginning with Henry and Sidney Cowell's slight 1955 biography, offers a sunny, straightforward view of the composer's creative legacy from his eccentric bandmaster father. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 6, 1992

"Not quite a world-beater—and a bit of a downer for an Olympic year—but worth the attention of anyone serious about the future of humanity in the sporting arena and beyond."
An ambitious and jolting, if occasionally turgid, investigation into the origins and wider implications of the contemporary union of science and sport. Read full book review >
SHOELESS JOE AND RAGTIME BASEBALL by Harvey Frommer
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

Another peek at baseball's good old days—or, in this case, bad old days—by veteran sports-historian Frommer (Growing Up at Bat, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1992

"An amusing entry that's as easy to digest, and about as nourishing, as a bottle of designer mineral water. (Illustrations.)"
Stand-up comic Rudner sits down to produce a collection of light little essays. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

"Sampson fails to reach the authority and quality achieved by Michael Bamberger in To the Linksland (reviewed above), but his book has obvious appeal for golf-history and nostalgia buffs. (Sixteen-page b&w photo insert—not seen.)"
While it's arguable that 1960—as golf-pro turned golf-writer Sampson claims—was the watershed year for professional golf, it does offer a springboard for an interesting if slipshod study of golfing greats Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Ben Hogan at contrasting stages of their careers. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 1, 1992

The title (a nominee for dullest of the year) refers to the day that Big Ed Delahanty, a heavy-drinking, heavy-hitting baseball superstar, tumbled down Niagara Falls to his death. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >