Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 4)

TINSELTOWN by William J. Mann
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"While searching for a solution to the sensational crime, Mann masterfully captures the zeitgeist of Hollywood in its early days."
Who killed William Desmond Taylor? More than 90 years after the unsolved murder of the renowned director, film historian and biographer Mann (Hello Gorgeous: Becoming Barbra Streisand, 2012, etc.) takes up the cold case. Read full book review >
SCRIBE by Bob Ryan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A terrific memoir with lessons for young journalists, sports fans and anyone who shares the love of the games."
The classic American sportswriter reflects on a half-century of covering the games we play. Read full book review >

NOT MY FATHER'S SON by Alan Cumming
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A raw, revealing memoir from a courageous actor and writer."
The award-winning actor uncovers his family's darkest secret. Read full book review >
THE ART OF NOISE by Daniel Rachel
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A splendid treat for music aficionados."
Interviews with more than two dozen leading British rock and pop songwriters. Read full book review >
BREAKFAST AT SOTHEBY'S by Philip Hook
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 2, 2014

"A winner. Readers will learn more about the modern art market in this simple book than in any college course."
Hook (The Ultimate Trophy: How the Impressionist Painting Conquered the World, 2009, etc.) uses his years of experience to explain why paintings succeed or fail. Read full book review >

BOY ON ICE by John Branch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A sad, tragic story that underscores the high human cost of violent entertainment."
Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Branch debuts with a biography of hockey player Derek Boogaard (1982-2011), a fierce fighter on the ice who died of an overdose of alcohol and prescription painkillers at the age of 28. Read full book review >
THE SENSE OF STYLE by Steven Pinker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Fatter and more complex than Strunk and White, and some of the more technical arguments may make this a tough sell on the first-year comp front. Still, Pinker's vade mecum is a worthy addition to any writer's library."
Yet another how-to book on writing? Indeed, but this is one of the best to come along in many years, a model of intelligent signposting and syntactical comportment. Read full book review >
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL by Ellen T. Harris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"Musical in structure, tone and emotional effect."
An author of scholarly works about George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) returns with a more general work about the prolific composer and his milieu. Read full book review >
A SLIP OF THE KEYBOARD by Terry Pratchett
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Lit throughout by the bright star of wonder."
The celebrated creator of the Discworld series of fantasy novels offers an eclectic collection of pieces and speeches from as early as the 1970s. Read full book review >
RICKEY & ROBINSON by Roger Kahn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A gripping, informative blend of memoir and cultural history."
The author of the classic The Boys of Summer (1972) and numerous other titles about the national pastime returns with a personal account of the fracturing of the racial barrier in Major League Baseball. Read full book review >
COSBY by Mark Whitaker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"The answer is yes, and in more ways than one. An eye-opening book and a pleasure to read."
Readable, thoughtful life of the brilliant comedian and entrepreneur. Read full book review >
THE FIGHTER'S WAY by Nick Gorman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A snappy little handbook that could easily lead to deeper involvement in the sport."
South African national muay thai champion Gorman offers a concise introduction to this martial art. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >