Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews

APPROVAL JUNKIE by Faith Salie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"Funny, touching essays on being a multifaceted woman with unique dreams, desires, and needs."
A TV and radio host acknowledges her need to be liked and tells how she's worked hard to overcome this. Read full book review >
LIVES OF THE POETS (WITH GUITARS) by Ray Robertson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 12, 2016

"Despite the title adapted from Samuel Johnson and the occasional reference to Aristotle or Kierkegaard, Robertson does not strain to justify the music as poetry in this solid collection of essays."
A Canadian novelist illuminates the lives and careers of musicians he loves in a dozen critical essays. Read full book review >

NEW YORK'S YIDDISH THEATER by Edna Nahshon
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 8, 2016

"A witty and absorbing demonstration of the interplay of minority and mainstream—with the minority culture here being of outsize influence over the larger culture of Broadway, Hollywood, and America."
Take my wife…please! Nahshon (Theater/Jewish Theological Seminary) charts a transformative artistic lineage from the shtetl to Broadway, the Borscht Belt, and beyond. Read full book review >
THE NEAREST THING TO LIFE by James Wood
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 28, 2015

"Deeply thoughtful essays on literature's gifts and consolations."
The New Yorker critic celebrates the richness of literature in his own life. Read full book review >
DELTA LADY by Rita Coolidge
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Where memoirs from bigger stars often fail to deliver, this illuminating autobiography exceeds expectations."
A surprisingly rich memoir from a two-time Grammy winner and acclaimed backup singer. Read full book review >

SPEAKING FREELY by Robert L. Bernstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"A well-written book for lovers of book publishing and supporters of human rights."
Former Random House President Bernstein gives a fascinating history of publishing in the 20th century and traces the beginnings of the human rights movement. Read full book review >
ORSON WELLES, VOLUME 3 by Simon Callow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Welles rightly imagined that people would never stop writing about him after he died. Callow continues to set the standard in this increasingly crowded field."
Juicy, provocative latest installment in the comprehensive life of a self-destructive genius. Read full book review >
HER AGAIN by Michael Schulman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 26, 2016

"A brisk, gossipy, and entertaining biography."
An admiring portrait of a rising star. Read full book review >
SEX IN THE MUSEUM by Sarah Forbes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A provocative chronicle steeped in eyebrow-raising details and personal honesty."
Dispatches from the front lines of the "Smithsonian of Sex." Read full book review >
MASTER OF CEREMONIES by Joel Grey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"An honest, eloquent, memorable autobiography."
The diminutive, unforgettable creator of the emcee in Cabaret both on stage and on screen writes frankly of his diverse career, exacting mother, and public embrace of his homosexuality.Read full book review >
Glamourville by Eric Coyote
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Nov. 28, 2015

"A harsh film-industry coming-of-age story."
Coyote (Invaders from the Outer Rim, 2015, etc.) delivers a novel about a young man making his way in Hollywood. Read full book review >
CHASING WATER by Anthony Ervin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"A provocative and refreshingly honest redemption memoir."
A celebrated Olympian recounts how he rose to the top of his sport, crashed, and found redemption. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >