Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews

I, MIGRANT by Sami Shah
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2015

"Humor at its most vigorous and unsparing."
A Pakistani-born comic's account of how he sought salvation in stand-up comedy and then found a new home in Australia. Read full book review >
SO MANY ROADS by David Browne
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2015

"One of the better books on the band and welcome reading in this 50th anniversary year."
Righteous testimonial to the anarchic goodness that was the Grateful Dead. Read full book review >

MEN IN GREEN by Michael Bamberger
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 7, 2015

"This book about 'old men and their war stories' is full of golf lore and will be a pleasure for fans and historians of the game, specifically the era between the 1950s and the 1970s."
A sportswriter embarks on a "legends tour" to discover the experiences of both the biggest and the uncelebrated names and contests in golf and capture those veteran players "as they actually are" today. Read full book review >
Franco Corelli and a Revolution in Singing by Stefan Zucker
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 18, 2015

"Strictly for opera aficionados, a detailed, passionate analysis of what makes tenor singing and its practitioners unique."
A critical look at the evolution of operatic tenor singing, from the 19th century to the present. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS

"A breezy guide that takes readers inside the sometimes hair-raising world of do-it-yourself filmmaking, capturing its many frustrations and challenges."
An instructional manual on film directing, inspired by the making of a "microbudget" movie. Read full book review >

BILLIE HOLIDAY by John Szwed
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2015

"As with the best of Holiday's music, this elegant and perceptive study is restrained, nuanced, and masterfully carried out."
Esteemed music scholar Szwed (Alan Lomax: The Man Who Recorded the World, 2010, etc.) offers a portrait of Lady Day as artist and mythmaker rather than tragic victim.Read full book review >
THE GREAT DETECTIVE by Zach Dundas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A bright read for Sherlock's fans."
A lively look at the enduring detective. Read full book review >
YOUR BAND SUCKS by Jon Fine
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 19, 2015

"'I don't regret a thing,' writes Fine, and neither will readers who live vicariously through the author's eyes and memory."
The short shelf of great books on indie rock adds another—an unlikely memoir about an obscure band that somehow found demand for its reunion in the Internet age. Read full book review >
TY COBB by Charles Leerhsen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"Cobb was indeed a bruised peach but, as the author shows convincingly, not a thoroughly rotten one."
The former executive editor of Sports Illustrated explores the idea that Tyrus Raymond Cobb (1886-1961), perhaps the greatest player in baseball history, was also a violent, racist, roundly hated person. Read full book review >
BROADCAST HYSTERIA by A. Brad Schwartz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2015

"An entertaining assessment of a watershed moment in American life and its lasting effect on popular culture."
A skeptical look at the panic that might have been. Read full book review >
KEEPERS by Richard Schickel
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 23, 2015

"Schickel found writing this collection 'a rather playful business'; readers will find it infused with his joy."
A noted critic celebrates the pleasure of movies. Read full book review >
THE COLONEL AND HUG by Steve Steinberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2015

"A top-notch sports biography."
Many baseball fans think it was Babe Ruth who elevated the fledgling (and flagging) New York Yankees team. In this authoritative new work, Steinberg and Spatz (1921: The Yankees, the Giants, and the Battle for Baseball Supremacy in New York, 2010) shine a light on the indispensable contributions of two behind-the-scenes magicians.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >