YEAR OF TEE HORSE by Eric Hatch

YEAR OF TEE HORSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Young adults will enjoy this carefree tale which mixes a Madison Avenue advertising background with Madison Square Garden horse shows. Hatch, who wrote My Man Godfrey, is an American Wodehouse and the Freddie Bolton family he writes about here has all the ebullient middle-browism of a TV family series. Freddie, who commutes from Westport, is a harried ad executive whose teen-age daughter has caught the riding bug. Since Freddie is deep in debt, he gets the idea of having his Aspercel account (read Alka Seltzer) pay for his daughter's new horse and stable. In return, the horse is christened Aspercel and soon wins many blue ribbons and much free publicity. The main problem that arises is that his daughter is overtrained and afraid to ride...By the author's light touch, Freddie survives the cliches of his characterization and has a climactic slapstick Jaunt on Aspercel. The tone of the book is set by Freddie's vodka sandwiches (recipe: vodka topped with ginger ale roofed with vodka).

Pub Date: Oct. 7th, 1965
Publisher: Crown