THE REVOLUTION OF HOPE by Erich Fromm

THE REVOLUTION OF HOPE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Dr. Fromm sees two directions in which humanity can move: either toward a completely mechanized society in which the individual will be merely a cog, or toward a renaissance of hope and humanism in which technology is exclusively at the service of human well-being. The hope of mankind lies in the latter, though, at the moment, we seem to be moving toward the former. The book really is an examination of terms and conditions -- what is meant by ""hope,"" by ""human"" and ""humanism,"" by ""technology,"" and where we stand at present in relation to those qualities, although in the final chapters Dr. Fromm puts forward some solid suggestions for a change of directions, for a ""revolution of hope"" centering on a peaceful, but forceful movement headed up by a National Council, to influence foreign and internal affairs. The book is realistic in the sense that it takes into account difficulties such as public apathy and inertia; and it is idealistic, because it assumes, too readily, that the difficulties can be overcome by something less than a violent upheaval in which the old values, sanctified by belief both social and religious, are swept away. Nonetheless, Dr. Fromm offers a vision of the future for a hopeful minority of movers and shakers.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1968
Publisher: Harper & Row