A good introduction to issues within the fashion industry, but activist readers might need some encouragement to pick it up.

READ REVIEW

CAN YOUR OUTFIT CHANGE THE WORLD?

From the PopActivism series

Not all activism starts with fundraising or marching. You can begin in small ways, like with your clothes.

Beginning with her story about making a prom dress from her math homework and then donating her prom-dress funds to charity (not as original as it sounds, as a simple Google search reveals), white author Paisley leads teens toward an activist approach to their clothing. Starting with the how and the who of clothing manufacturing, she asks readers to think about the impact of the clothes they wear on the environment and on the people who make them under exhausting conditions. Ethical clothing brands and stores are highlighted, with a Canadian slant. (Both author and publisher are Canadian.) After discussions of methods to reduce, reuse, and recycle, the latter third of the book focuses on the bigger picture, such as understanding messages in fashion and providing examples of how teens can speak out. Peppered with photos and “pop quiz” sidebars to inspire further thought, this slim volume gallops through fashion activism. Discussion of diversity and gender roles in fashion is a welcome inclusion in addition to this book’s solid information. Unfortunately, the glossy slickness of the presentation might keep this book out of the hands of those who might be interested.

A good introduction to issues within the fashion industry, but activist readers might need some encouragement to pick it up. (glossary, resources) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Feb. 20, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4598-1306-9

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: Nov. 22, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2017

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An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist.

MAYA LIN

THINKING WITH HER HANDS

One of the world’s most celebrated creators of civic architecture is profiled in this accessible, engaging biography.

Similar in style and format to her Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family (2014) and Wideness and Wonder: The Life and Art of Georgia O’Keeffe (2011), Rubin’s well-researched profile examines the career, creative processes, and career milestones of Maya Lin. Rubin discusses at length Lin’s most famous achievement, designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Chinese-American Lin was a reserved college student who entered and won the competition to design and build the memorial. Her youth and ethnicity were subjects of great controversy, and Rubin discusses how Lin fought to ensure her vision of the memorial remained intact. Other notable works by Lin, including the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a library and chapel for the Children’s Defense Fund, the Museum of Chinese in America, and the outdoor Wave Field project are examined but not in as much depth as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Attractively designed, the book is illustrated extensively with color photos and drawings.

An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist. (bibliography, source notes, index) (Biography. 12-15)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0837-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chronicle

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing,...

EYES & SPIES

HOW YOU'RE TRACKED AND WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW

From the Visual Exploration series

The word “Orwellian” is oddly absent in this chilling look at how we now live in a world of near-constant surveillance and data collection.

Kyi examines how information and data about almost everyone are collected and used by individuals, government agencies, companies, and other organizations. She poses three questions to readers: who’s watching, and why? Where is the line between public and private? How can you keep your secrets to yourself? These questions are addressed in chapters exploring such subjects as computer surveillance, cyberbullying, data mining, and personal privacy. There is discussion of such surveillance technologies as drones, GPS, and RFID tags. Although there is little here that does not seem creepy, “Creepy Line” sidebars in each chapter highlight controversial real-life scenarios and ask readers where they would set their own boundaries. That label refers to a statement from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who said the company’s policy was “to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.” There are also ongoing arguments posed for both increased security and increased privacy, encouraging readers to think critically about the issues.

Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing, thoughtful, and provocative introduction to a complex subject and alarming realities. (further reading, source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: March 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-55451-911-8

Page Count: 140

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2017

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