MAPPING THE WORLD by Erwin Raisz
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MAPPING THE WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This competent, complete survey provides an excellent beginner's introduction to the fascinating history and science of cartography. From the time when a drawing in the sand sufficed to send Beshan's son Ahab successfully across the desert to Trading Bay, Mr. Raisz contends that the mapping instinct was always strong in man and developed to a high degree of efficiency where there was a greater need for it. From there, he charts the development of the science, the helpful principles of parallels and meridians, latitudes and longitudes, as they were used by the Greeks Eratosthenes and Posidinus and by Ptolemy whose mistake of making the world smaller led to some famous future navigational errors. Through Columbus' day, when opinion was divided as to the world's flatness or roundness, to the masterful Dutch cartographers of the 16th and 17th centuries and on up to modern day methods and procedures- including serial photography- the material presented should satisfy many a curiosity. Not easy reading, but a book to get one's teeth into.

Pub Date: Nov. 15th, 1956
Publisher: Abelard-Schuman