Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

A REALLY BIG LUNCH by Jim Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2017

"If this is the last we get from Harrison, it serves as a fitting memorial."
A celebration of eating well and drinking even better as a recipe for the good life. Read full book review >
ALL THESE WONDERS by Catherine Burns
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 21, 2017

"As Neil Gaiman writes in his foreword, 'the Moth teaches us not to judge by appearances. It teaches us to listen. It reminds us to empathize.' Here's to at least 20 more years."
The Moth's 20-year retrospective contains all the hope, sadness, triumphs, and tribulations that have defined the pioneering live reading series since its modest debut in 1997. Read full book review >

ROMANIAN NOTEBOOK by Cyrus Console
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2017

"A large step for the writer that reads like a smaller accomplishment."
A middle-age rite-of-passage memoir by a writing teacher and published poet. Read full book review >
PRACTICE RESURRECTION by Erik Reece
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"Reece's insightful, witty, and reflective essays offer up new ways of thinking about spirituality, culture, and the environment."
Religion, ecology, literature, family, and ideas all commingle in this collection. Read full book review >
AN ARRANGEMENT OF SKIN by Anna Journey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"Even though they get a bit precious at times and sometimes lose their way, the essays always come together 'to resurrect and walk.'"
Poet Journey (English/Univ. of Southern California; Vulgar Remedies, 2013, etc.) gathers 14 quirky, earthy, lyrical essays, a number of which have been previously published. Read full book review >

PRINTER'S ERROR by Rebecca Romney
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A spritely visit to the land of rare books."
The role of printed books in Western civilization recounted in diverting essays that recapitulate some significant events in the annals of bibliomania. Read full book review >
WORD BY WORD by Kory Stamper
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Those aficionados who love words and the language or who are big-time Scrabble fans will love this book, while others will feel like they're in over their heads."
Strange words and how to find them. Read full book review >
NABOKOV'S FAVORITE WORD IS MAUVE by Ben Blatt
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 14, 2017

"If you want to know how many times Chuck Palahniuk uses the verb 'snuff,' this is just the thing. Illuminating entertainment for literary readers."
Literary criticism by the numbers. Read full book review >
HOW WE SPEAK TO ONE ANOTHER by Ander Monson
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A cornucopia of essays sure to lead to conversations with one another that will inform, puzzle, and surprise."
Take one daily and call me every morning. That's the website header for Essay Daily, the source for this anthology. Read full book review >
FREE WOMEN, FREE MEN by Camille Paglia
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"Controversial views on women's lives and nature that may appeal to Paglia's fans but not win her many more."
Essays, reviews, and interviews chronicle the career of a self-described "libertarian feminist." Read full book review >
AMERICAN ORIGINALITY by Louise Glück
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A love of poetry—of the poet's life—infuses these essays and brings a glow to the theoretical and a bright flame to the personal."
A celebrated poet collects some recent essays on theory, craft, and other poets. Read full book review >
THE MOTHER OF ALL QUESTIONS by Rebecca Solnit
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"As always, Solnit is eloquent and sharply insightful."
A distinguished cultural critic tackles "the binaries and boundaries of gender" while examining the continuing evolution of feminism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >