Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

DIALOGUE by Robert McKee
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 12, 2016

"A rich and useful companion for practicing writers."
How to write dialogue that is convincing, effective, and original. Read full book review >
CRITICS, MONSTERS, FANATICS, AND OTHER LITERARY ESSAYS by Cynthia Ozick
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 5, 2016

"Often intricate and lovely leaves from the author's literary tree."
A veteran and venerated literary essayist, critic, and novelist collects some recent (some previously unpublished) reviews and essays. Read full book review >

WHO SHOT SPORTS by Gail Buckland
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: July 5, 2016

"Essential for all students of sports history and of photography and a fine gift for buffs as well."
Superb anthology of sports photographs, coupled with an illuminating text exploring the making of images both iconic and unknown. Read full book review >
750 Laws in Sociology by Mark Bird
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 1, 2016

"An engaging but overreaching sociological treatise."
An eclectic mix of sociological facts, opinions, and other fodder for the curious. Read full book review >
JACKSON, 1964 by Calvin Trillin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 28, 2016

"Haunting pieces that show how our window on the past is often a mirror."
A veteran reporter collects some significant pieces about race that originally appeared in the New Yorker, his publishing home since 1963. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 28, 2016

"An absolute must for any Star Trek fan."
"Boldly go where no man has gone before": the oral history of the Star Trek franchise. Read full book review >
FALSE CHOICES by Liza Featherstone
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"One doesn't have to be as far left as most of these essayists to see the contradictions in the subject's credentials as a progressive feminist."
A collection of essays from radical activists and academics eviscerating Hillary Clinton's brand of feminism. Read full book review >
HOGS WILD by Ian Frazier
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 7, 2016

"Pieces that show Frazier's ranging curiosity, lucent style, and capacious heart."
The veteran humorist and reporter for the New Yorker presents a collection of pieces that record his pursuits of wild hogs, hermit crabs, Asian carp, a Styrofoam substitute, and numerous other quarry. Read full book review >
THE HATRED OF POETRY by Ben Lerner
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 7, 2016

"A learned but knotty defense on poetry's behalf, persuasive to no one but those who need no convincing."
Poetry doesn't want to be your friend. Get over it. Read full book review >
BLACK MAN, WHITE HOUSE by D.L. Hughley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Funny, insightful, and legitimately illuminating."
The Obama years, through a glass cleverly. Read full book review >
HOW TO WRITE LIKE TOLSTOY by Richard Cohen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 31, 2016

"Mostly standard writing advice, minus the bullet points, plus the gleanings from a lifetime of reading and thought."
A veteran editor, teacher, and author assembles some advice for aspiring writers of fiction. Read full book review >
THE GEEK FEMINIST REVOLUTION by Kameron Hurley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 31, 2016

"Passion and commitment permeate the writing as Hurley illuminates the online cultural vanguard from a feminist's perspective."
A feminist manifesto from the front lines of fantasy fiction, Internet flaming, and Gamergate battles. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >