Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

A REALLY BIG LUNCH by Jim Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 24, 2017

"If this is the last we get from Harrison, it serves as a fitting memorial."
A celebration of eating well and drinking even better as a recipe for the good life. Read full book review >
ALL THESE WONDERS by Catherine Burns
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 21, 2017

"As Neil Gaiman writes in his foreword, 'the Moth teaches us not to judge by appearances. It teaches us to listen. It reminds us to empathize.' Here's to at least 20 more years."
The Moth's 20-year retrospective contains all the hope, sadness, triumphs, and tribulations that have defined the pioneering live reading series since its modest debut in 1997. Read full book review >

PRACTICE RESURRECTION by Erik Reece
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"Reece's insightful, witty, and reflective essays offer up new ways of thinking about spirituality, culture, and the environment."
Religion, ecology, literature, family, and ideas all commingle in this collection. Read full book review >
HOW WE SPEAK TO ONE ANOTHER by Ander Monson
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A cornucopia of essays sure to lead to conversations with one another that will inform, puzzle, and surprise."
Take one daily and call me every morning. That's the website header for Essay Daily, the source for this anthology. Read full book review >
AMERICAN ORIGINALITY by Louise Glück
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A love of poetry—of the poet's life—infuses these essays and brings a glow to the theoretical and a bright flame to the personal."
A celebrated poet collects some recent essays on theory, craft, and other poets. Read full book review >

THE MOTHER OF ALL QUESTIONS by Rebecca Solnit
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"As always, Solnit is eloquent and sharply insightful."
A distinguished cultural critic tackles "the binaries and boundaries of gender" while examining the continuing evolution of feminism. Read full book review >
MORE ALIVE AND LESS LONELY by Jonathan Lethem
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A throwaway line from an essay on amnesia sums up this standout collection: 'I followed the higher principle of pleasure, tried to end where I'd started: with writing I loved and wanted to recommend to someone else. That is to say, you.'"
One of America's most accomplished writers looks back between the pages of other writers' books. Read full book review >
ANATOMY OF INNOCENCE by Laura Caldwell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors."
A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system. Read full book review >
YOU, TOO, COULD WRITE A POEM by David Orr
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Orr says the greatest compliment for any critic 'is to say that you found yourself thinking of his writing the next time you encountered a good poem.' He abundantly deserves that same praise."
Fresh, vigorous, spirited views on poets and their work. Read full book review >
DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >
HOME AND AWAY by Karl Ove Knausgaard
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Though the correspondence is mostly about soccer, it is also about so much more."
An epistolary exploration of soccer and life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >