Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 2)

A New Science by Mukesh Prasad
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"While exploring a rich variety of topics, from climate change to Einstein, this collection of scientific thoughts lacks polish."
A scientific freethinker draws on his Usenet posts to argue for reinterpretations of mainstream theories. Read full book review >
Peter Thiel by Richard Byrne Reilly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2016

"A short, scattered introduction to Thiel's worldview in his own words."
A compilation of entrepreneur Peter Thiel's thoughts on seemingly everyone and everything. Read full book review >

THE PRESIDENTS AND THE CONSTITUTION by Ken Gormley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 10, 2016

"A useful, educational tome featuring top-drawer contributors—though female scholars are woefully underrepresented."
A fluidly fashioned collection of essays about how the roster of American presidents shaped the executive duties as defined in the Constitution. Read full book review >
DAVE HILL DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE by Dave Hill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"Hill makes an amiable companion, and if his stories aren't earth-shattering, his unforced humor is worth a few chuckles."
An unassuming and amusing collection of essays that touches lightly on the modest events of a believably undramatic life. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CLOD by Gary Snyder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2016

"Elegant and thoughtful, with much to read between the lines in commentary on a long life's work. Students and admirers of Snyder will be enchanted and intrigued."
The noted poet and essayist returns with a deceptively small book enfolding a lifetime's worth of study. Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 6, 2016

"A comprehensive, erudite narrative that traces the history of a group dedicated to exploring alternative and effective patient care delivery."
A book examines the pioneering evolution of a health care initiative centered on mind-body medicine. Read full book review >
ON FRIENDSHIP by Alexander Nehamas
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 3, 2016

"For those wanting to see how the concept of friendship in Western civilization has evolved since Aristotle, this study offers a useful, if idiosyncratic survey."
This conceptual exploration of friendship sees both the good and the bad. Read full book review >
HOW ENGLISH BECAME ENGLISH by Simon Horobin
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A happy mixture of scholarship, clear writing, and humor."
A linguistics scholar glances at the history of the English language and takes on some contentious contemporary issues—from "fewer" and "less" to the relationship between language and social status. Read full book review >
OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
REAL ARTISTS HAVE DAY JOBS by Sara Benincasa
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 26, 2016

"Raunchy and unabashedly unapologetic, this is useful, take-no-prisoners humor."
Raw and ribald advice for growing up. Read full book review >
CALLINGS by Dave Isay
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 19, 2016

"Inspiring, insightful, and thoroughly readable."
A distinguished public radio producer's collection of conversations with Americans who "found…their way to doing exactly what they were meant to do with their lives." Read full book review >
APPROVAL JUNKIE by Faith Salie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"Funny, touching essays on being a multifaceted woman with unique dreams, desires, and needs."
A TV and radio host acknowledges her need to be liked and tells how she's worked hard to overcome this. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >