Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 2)

THE MOTHER OF ALL QUESTIONS by Rebecca Solnit
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"As always, Solnit is eloquent and sharply insightful."
A distinguished cultural critic tackles "the binaries and boundaries of gender" while examining the continuing evolution of feminism. Read full book review >
MORE ALIVE AND LESS LONELY by Jonathan Lethem
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2017

"A throwaway line from an essay on amnesia sums up this standout collection: 'I followed the higher principle of pleasure, tried to end where I'd started: with writing I loved and wanted to recommend to someone else. That is to say, you.'"
One of America's most accomplished writers looks back between the pages of other writers' books. Read full book review >

ANATOMY OF INNOCENCE by Laura Caldwell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors."
A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system. Read full book review >
SMOKE SNORT SWALLOW SHOOT by Jacob Hoye
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 7, 2017

"An overwhelmingly sad and consistently vulgar anthology."
Rehashed tales of rock 'n' roll excess prove that even the most powerfully creative voices in music can be tone deaf about drug addiction. Read full book review >
SOUTH AND WEST by Joan Didion
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"An almost spectral text haunted by a past that never seems distant."
A revealing publication from the celebrated prose stylist. Read full book review >

LETTERS TO A YOUNG FARMER by Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 7, 2017

"Though the book may scare off almost as many prospective farmers as it encourages, the contributors argue their cases with an effective polemical tenor."
Longtime advocates of sustainable agriculture join with new voices for a comradely take on the challenging future of farming. Read full book review >
HOW THE HELL DID THIS HAPPEN? by P.J. O’Rourke
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"It's not Hunter S. Thompson, and O'Rourke has been funnier, lots funnier—but then again, it may just be that our current political situation is no laughing matter."
Tossed-off bons mots on "this obnoxious political spectacle, the election of 2016." Read full book review >
PAIN WOMAN TAKES YOUR KEYS, AND OTHER ESSAYS FROM A NERVOUS SYSTEM by Sonya Huber
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 1, 2017

"Frank, thoughtful reflections that should resonate with the 47 percent of Americans reported to be living with chronic pain."
Meditative, intimate essays consider the experience of suffering. Read full book review >
ANIMALS STRIKE CURIOUS POSES by Elena Passarello
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Passarello manages to chronicle humanity's cavalier exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals without getting preachy in the process—no mean feat. If only the entirety of the book reflected the gifts the author demonstrates at her best."
An essayist populates a bestiary of an ark with famous animals from history, all celebrated by humans even as we harnessed and exploited them. Read full book review >
PASSING TIME by Andrea Köhler
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 25, 2017

"A lovely jeu d'esprit for those waiters who like their abeyance with a touch of the metaphysical."
What are we doing when we aren't doing anything? Read full book review >
OTHER PEOPLE by David Shields
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Uneven but mostly sharp and appealing."
An assortment of musings, cultural critiques, and memoir. Read full book review >
TRUMP'S AMERICA by Scott Dikkers
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Sure to appeal to Onion fans and anyone unhappy with our current president."
A founding editor of the Onion provides a satirical guide to surviving Donald Trump's America. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >