Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 2)

HUMANS OF NEW YORK by Brandon Stanton
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A wondrous mix of races, ages, genders, and social classes, and on virtually every page is a surprise."
Photographer and author Stanton returns with a companion volume to Humans of New York (2013), this one with similarly affecting photographs of New Yorkers but also with some tales from his subjects' mouths.Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Wildly creative ideas from intelligent writers who want more for women, regardless of race, religion, or sexual preference."
A few dozen writers envision a more balanced world. Read full book review >

HISTORY'S PEOPLE by Margaret MacMillan
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A concise, educational overview of some of the men and women who have carved out spots in the annals of history and why they should be remembered. Fans of the author are in for another treat."
An acclaimed historian gives her take on some of the important people who have shaped the present world. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Cogent and thoughtful, if nostalgic, essays urging our attention not to iPads and smartphones but to art."
A literary critic questions the effect of digital technology on minds, literature, and creativity. Read full book review >
Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An often masterful hybrid of self-help and firsthand history."
Haas (Dakini Power, 2013) offers a combination of science reportage, memoir, and advice on the subject of trauma.Read full book review >

ME, MY HAIR, AND I by Elizabeth Benedict
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Surprisingly engaging reading."
A distinguished novelist gathers together essays that attempt to untangle the complicated relationship of females to their hair. Read full book review >
THE 50s by The New Yorker
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Superb: a gift that keeps on giving and a fine introduction to the life and letters of a supposedly (but not really) gray decade."
Following on the previous anthology, The 40s (2014), the editors of the New Yorker continue to mine the magazine's impossibly rich history.Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A firm response to currently accepted dog-training methods."
A convincing guide for dog owners as well as a memoir of instructive adventures set in nature. Read full book review >
Sightseeing in the Undiscovered Country by Louisa Oakley Green
Released: Sept. 23, 2015

"A compassionate, intelligent survey of supernatural experiences."
The wife of a psychic gathers reports from everyday people who believe they've glimpsed the beyond. Read full book review >
THE NIXON TAPES by Douglas Brinkley
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Essential for students of late-20th-century American history and the Nixon presidency."
Brinkley and Nichter (The Nixon Tapes: 1971-1972, 2014, etc.) conclude their project of publishing highlights from Richard Nixon's infamous tapes with this volume from the last year of recording.Read full book review >
WHY NOT ME? by Mindy Kaling
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Intrepid and often irreverent, Kaling humbly probes her own triumphs and defeats with laugh-out-loud results."
Light yet insightful personal essays from one of Hollywood's cleverest writers. Read full book review >
MYSTERIES OF THE MALL by Witold Rybczynski
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A superb book for those interested in architectural history, written in an easygoing style by a man with encyclopedic knowledge and an obvious great love for building."
In this illuminating collection of essays, Rybczynski (Emeritus, Architecture/Univ. of Pennsylvania; How Architecture Works, 2013, etc.) documents the wide-ranging effects of the men who built America in the 20th century.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >