Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 3)

THIS IDEA MUST DIE by John Brockman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"Although they often beat dead or nonexistent horses, these ingenious cerebral tidbits will stimulate, provoke and confuse (in a good way) intelligent readers."
New science has a difficult time. As physicist Max Planck said long ago, a good idea does not automatically replace a bad one; "opponents eventually die and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it." Read full book review >
MY AVANT-GARDE EDUCATION by Bernard Cooper
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2015

"An unconventional narrative that focuses on sharp, piercing moments."
PEN/Hemingway Award winner Cooper (The Bill from My Father: A Memoir, 2006, etc.) returns with a memoir/essay collection (some previously published) that chronicles his early interest in pop art and charts where that interest has taken him.Read full book review >

THE WISE LEGACY by Daniel J. Siegel
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 16, 2015

"Of greatest interest to those who knew Sidney Wise—but also a poignant reminder of a more civil political era."
This tribute volume collects statements from and interviews with students, colleagues, relatives, and friends of Sidney Wise, an influential professor. Read full book review >
SELECTED LETTERS OF LANGSTON HUGHES by Langston Hughes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 13, 2015

"A privileged perspective on the man and his art."
The renowned poet's life revealed in letters. Read full book review >
Confessions of a Time Traveler by R. Gary Raham
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 4, 2015

"A welcome excursion for pop-sci fans featuring a number of striking artworks."
In this diverse collectionof essays, short stories, illustrations, anecdotes, and other missives, Raham informs without being dry and teaches without being pedantic while covering a wide range of subjects in biology and the history of science.Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Writing that requires a receptive readership as flexible as the prose."
Short essays on libraries, literature and life. Read full book review >
THE TROUBLE WITH POST-BLACKNESS by Houston A. Baker
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A thoughtful, if not gentle, scholarly refutation of a controversial claim of a post-racial society."
What does it mean to be black in America now? A wide variety of scholars and deep thinkers respond in these essays on race, society, art and more. Read full book review >
WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A moving essay that should find its way into the hands of all students and teachers to provoke new conversation and awareness."
An enchanting plea by the award-winning Nigerian novelist to channel anger about gender inequality into positive change. Read full book review >
SOMETIMES AN ART by Bernard Bailyn
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 30, 2015

"Informing all of these graceful, authoritative essays is the mind of a humanist whose project is to reanimate 'a hitherto unglimpsed world.'"
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian considers the "unsuspected complexities" of recovering the past. Read full book review >
THE SOUND OF WATER by Joshua K. Linden
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 14, 2015

"A collection of well-written, perceptive, and quietly powerful essays, meant to be savored."
Linden, in his debut nonfiction work, shares insights gleaned from his years of reflection on the nature of the soul. Read full book review >
THE RADICAL KING by Martin Luther King Jr.
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"Though many of the entries are familiar, this useful collection takes King from the front lines of Southern segregation to a national movement for economic equality to an international condemnation of imperialism and armed intervention."
A reframing of Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy to celebrate his political radicalism. Read full book review >
THE ART OF NOT HAVING IT ALL by Melissa Kite
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"A smart, entertaining and woefully funny take on being female and single."
Spectator columnist Kite turns some of her most wince-worthy experiences as a single woman into a humorous memoir, previously published in the U.K. as Real Life.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >