Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 3)

WRITING HARD STORIES by Melanie Brooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An inspiring guide to ennobling personal stories that travel to the dark sides of life."
Investigations into the struggles of rendering painful memories on the page. Read full book review >
YOU, TOO, COULD WRITE A POEM by David Orr
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Orr says the greatest compliment for any critic 'is to say that you found yourself thinking of his writing the next time you encountered a good poem.' He abundantly deserves that same praise."
Fresh, vigorous, spirited views on poets and their work. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Deeply admiring biography mixed with much supposition that ranges from thought-provoking to ridiculous."
An author who has published frequently on leadership and leaders—from the Founding Fathers to Vince Lombardi—returns with his second book about Lincoln's leadership (Lincoln on Leadership, 1992). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Suitable primarily for working journalists and others concerned with support of a free press, this is a provocative compendium of issues confronting journalism as new technologies pose an array of threats to independent reporting."
Forget going to jail to protect your source—the government can simply identify her through metadata. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 6, 2017

"Readers may cavil with Athitakis' choices, but they can't question his research, erudition, and clarity of expression."
A collection of literary criticism that demonstrates how the Midwest of Willa Cather and Sinclair Lewis has been significantly altered in the works of novelists who have explored the region in recent decades. Read full book review >

DEMOCRACY by David A. Moss
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A sterling educational tool that offers a fresh presentation of how 'democracy in America has always been a contact sport.'"
A vigorous civics lesson of 19 case studies that illustrate America's evolving democratic processes and institutions. Read full book review >
THE PEN AND THE BRUSH by Anka Muhlstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"An enlightening exploration of the symbiotic relationship between art and literature."
How hundreds of stolen paintings affected 19th-century French writers. Read full book review >
HIGH NOTES by Gay Talese
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"A worthy collection that would have benefitted from further effort from the book's editor and publisher."
A short anthology of features from acclaimed newspaperman and magazine writer Talese (The Voyeur's Motel, 2016, etc.). Read full book review >
IMPRISONED by Arturo Benvenuti
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Stark renderings that go beyond simple aesthetic judgment produced by some of the artists who perished in concentration camps."
A visual testament to the horrors of Nazi cruelty is revived a generation after it first appeared. Read full book review >
INSANE CLOWN PRESIDENT by Matt Taibbi
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 16, 2017

"A lively set of dispatches that shows how even the harshest skeptic in the pundit class can be blindsided."
Looking back in bemusement and (eventually) anger at the 2016 presidential campaign with Rolling Stone's pugnacious political correspondent. Read full book review >
WATERCOLORS REVEALED! by
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 14, 2017

"An often inviting look at the alleged prophecies of a famous thinker."
Lloyd (Nostradamus Finally Revealed!, 2011) offers a meditation on images found within The Lost Book of Nostradamus.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >