Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 5)

THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN TYPEWRITER by Fergus Fleming
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Essential for fans of the James Bond books. And who isn't a fan?"
A collection of letters from the creator of Bond, James Bond. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Lucid, sinewy sentences lash, tickle, and caress."
A veteran essayist for the New York Times collects some gems from his pile of precious—though not always popular—stones.Read full book review >

THE GIVENNESS OF THINGS by Marilynne Robinson
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Deeply thoughtful essays on troubling and divisive cultural—and spiritual—issues."
A sober, passionate defense of Christian faith. Read full book review >
PORTRAITS by John Berger
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Although some of the more mannered pieces don't work as well as others, it's always Berger's unique, captivating mind on display in these unabashedly personal essays—and that never disappoints."
A Berger sampler: the esteemed art critic offers up personal portraits of a wide array of well-known and lesser-known artists and art works. Read full book review >
REPORTING ALWAYS by Lillian Ross
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Readable and rewarding and, though more than a touch old-fashioned, full of exemplary reporting."
An anthology of New Yorker stories form a living bridge to journalism's golden age—which, as it happens, wasn't all that long ago.Read full book review >

MY FATHER'S GUITAR AND OTHER IMAGINARY THINGS by Joseph Skibell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A memoir/essay collection of consistently heartfelt and enlightening morsels of humanity."
Creatively dispatched memories from a noted essayist and fiction writer. Read full book review >
EATING WORDS by Sandra M. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 26, 2015

"Useful as a textbook, the volume is a rewarding read for anyone who eats, cooks, or muses about food."
A literary feast for foodies. Read full book review >
Caution, Writer Ahead by Joel Habush
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 24, 2015

"An amusing compilation of Midwest-flavored wit and occasional astringency."
Habush offers a collection of comical essays, script parodies, and short humor pieces, a number of them riffing on the writing life. Read full book review >
Zarathustra by Abolghassem Khamneipur
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 21, 2015

"An indispensable introduction to the history of Zoroastrianism.
"
A comprehensive introduction to the ancient philosopher Zarathustra. Read full book review >
HUMANS OF NEW YORK by Brandon Stanton
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A wondrous mix of races, ages, genders, and social classes, and on virtually every page is a surprise."
Photographer and author Stanton returns with a companion volume to Humans of New York (2013), this one with similarly affecting photographs of New Yorkers but also with some tales from his subjects' mouths.Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Wildly creative ideas from intelligent writers who want more for women, regardless of race, religion, or sexual preference."
A few dozen writers envision a more balanced world. Read full book review >
HISTORY'S PEOPLE by Margaret MacMillan
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A concise, educational overview of some of the men and women who have carved out spots in the annals of history and why they should be remembered. Fans of the author are in for another treat."
An acclaimed historian gives her take on some of the important people who have shaped the present world. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >