Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 55)

BEARING LIFE by Rochelle Ratner
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 15, 2000

"An intricate and important anthology, ultimately using childlessness to develop a study of art, female identity, and self-understanding."
Over 50 women contribute to this engaging collection of essays, fiction, and poetry exploring childlessness. Read full book review >
THE HAND-CARVED CRECHE by James Kilgo
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 25, 1999

"Kilgo has stored up plenty of dimes, and we get to draw on their interest. (Author tour)"
This lean-limbed, superbly written southern memoir, set in the author's hometown of Darlington, South Carolina, collects four stories about the Christmas season. Read full book review >

ATOP AN UNDERWOOD by Jack Kerouac
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"A curmudgeon might say that, with rare exceptions, teenagers aren't old or experienced enough to create much of real artistic value; Kerouac's early efforts would fit such a maxim."
Kerouac's early writings—from ages 13 to 21—elucidate the formative years and provide insight into the later literature of the author's career. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS 1999 by Edward Hoagland
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 29, 1999

"A feast of fine, important writing."
Atwan's annual series unfailingly delivers the highest quality writing, essays that display "literary [and] ruminative characteristics," work that shows the "mind in process." Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 21, 1999

"The blend of the familiar with the novel is one among many reason Shange's collection remains so compelling to the very end."
paper 0-8070-6221-9 A literary buffet with treats so exquisitely sculpted that Martha Stewart would grimace with envy. Read full book review >

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 20, 1999

"Supporters of M.F.A. programs may resent egg-production metaphors, but it takes a tough writing program to make such tender short stories."
Three-and-a-half dozen grade-A short stories, as hatched in one of the country's premier academic incubators of creativity. Read full book review >
A LITTLE FLING by Sam Pickering
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Like good sipping whiskey, each administration of Pickering triggers a small, worthy revelation."
Essayist Pickering's (Deprived of Happiness, 1998, etc.) world is willfully circumscribed, mostly his family and friends (real and unreal) and the immediate landscape and what came in that day's mail, but he knows just how to coax from the ordinary the kind of sustained nourishment that imbues life with significance. Read full book review >
FEEDING THE EYE by Anne Hollander
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"While Hollander's intellectualism may verge on the academic, her passion for exploring the symbolism of art and clothing is anything but."
What might have been an unstable mix of essays and reviews on a variety of art forms—dance, film, fashion, and painting—instead coalesces into a thematically sound and richly varied collection. Read full book review >
THE BARBIE CHRONICLES by Yona Zeldis McDonough
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

THE BARBIE CHRONICLESA Living Doll Turns FortyMcDonough, Yona Zeldis—Ed. Read full book review >
MORE MATTER by John Updike
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 28, 1999

"Let us hope he changes his mind."
A strong gathering of essays, criticism, addresses, introductions, and autobiographical commentaries written and published over the past eight years. Read full book review >
METAL COWBOY by Joe Kurmaskie
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 10, 1999

"The metal cowboy is on a slow bike to nowhere in particular, and when he's not dispensing homilies, he knows how to enjoy the simple, immediate pleasures of two-wheeled freedom."
Fleet lessons, experiences, and absurdities, gathered from the saddle of a bicycle and mined for every identifiable nugget of humor or worthy apologue, from newcomer Kurmaskie. Read full book review >
A HUNDRED WHITE DAFFODILS by Jane Kenyon
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Though at times uneven and repetitive, this posthumous collection offers a rich and varied look into the working life of a well-loved American poet."
This somewhat choppy but affecting collection of translations, essays, interviews, and one new poem by Kenyon is indispensable reading for admirers of her work. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >