Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 7)

Physical Laws of the Mathematical Universe: Who Are We? by Neeti Sinha
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"An enthusiastic but unclear exercise in passion over perspicacity."
Metaphysics, cosmology, mathematics, and quantum physics collide in Sinha's (Absolute: Multidimensional Beingness, 2006) treatise. Read full book review >
CHANGING THE SUBJECT by Sven Birkerts
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Cogent and thoughtful, if nostalgic, essays urging our attention not to iPads and smartphones but to art."
A literary critic questions the effect of digital technology on minds, literature, and creativity. Read full book review >

Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"An often masterful hybrid of self-help and firsthand history."
Haas (Dakini Power, 2013) offers a combination of science reportage, memoir, and advice on the subject of trauma.Read full book review >
ME, MY HAIR, AND I by Elizabeth Benedict
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Surprisingly engaging reading."
A distinguished novelist gathers together essays that attempt to untangle the complicated relationship of females to their hair. Read full book review >
THE GOOD STORY by J.M. Coetzee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Caveat lector: the authors, both intellectual heavyweights, focus much more on psychology—and group psychology, where Coetzee keeps pushing the discussion—than on literature."
A discussion between the Nobel Prize-winning novelist and a clinical psychologist on the narratives that their work shares. Read full book review >

Why Leaders Fight by Michael C. Horowitz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"A thoughtful re-examination of the causal agents that move history."
An exacting analysis of the way state leaders influence geopolitical events and, in turn, history at large. Read full book review >
THE 50s by The New Yorker
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Superb: a gift that keeps on giving and a fine introduction to the life and letters of a supposedly (but not really) gray decade."
Following on the previous anthology, The 40s (2014), the editors of the New Yorker continue to mine the magazine's impossibly rich history.Read full book review >
Joy by Lucindi
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Sweet reflections on adopting a positive perspective."
A career woman-turned­-stay-at-home mother shares her thoughts on embracing inner joy in this debut essay collection. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 24, 2015

"A firm response to currently accepted dog-training methods."
A convincing guide for dog owners as well as a memoir of instructive adventures set in nature. Read full book review >
Sightseeing in the Undiscovered Country by Louisa Oakley Green
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 23, 2015

"A compassionate, intelligent survey of supernatural experiences."
The wife of a psychic gathers reports from everyday people who believe they've glimpsed the beyond. Read full book review >
THE NIXON TAPES by Douglas Brinkley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Essential for students of late-20th-century American history and the Nixon presidency."
Brinkley and Nichter (The Nixon Tapes: 1971-1972, 2014, etc.) conclude their project of publishing highlights from Richard Nixon's infamous tapes with this volume from the last year of recording.Read full book review >
THIS MUSLIM AMERICAN LIFE by Moustafa Bayoumi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 2015

"A thoughtful study, certainly relevant if occasionally one-noted."
Closely observed, somewhat repetitive collection of mostly previously published essays by the author of the award-winning How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America (2009).Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >