Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 7)

101 TWO-LETTER WORDS by Stephin Merritt
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 6, 2014

"Any reader's vocabulary is likely to grow after reading Merritt's quirky wordplay, but edification is not the point; fun is, and Merritt and Chast deliver just that."
From "aa" to "zz," a compendium of curious words. Read full book review >
IMPOLITE CONVERSATIONS by Cora Daniels
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Lively discussion, occasionally sloppy prose and refreshing candor from two keen observers."
Two accomplished black professionals alternate outspoken, provocative views that revolve around race relations in America. Read full book review >

THE GETAWAY CAR by Donald E. Westlake
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 24, 2014

"Westlake kept a list of possible book titles, the last of which was Read Me. It would have been just the right one for this bright, witty book."
Assorted selections from a beloved crime writer. Read full book review >
HYENA by Jude Angelini
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"A grating collection from a poor-man's Howard Stern."
An explicit collection of stories from the host of The All Out Show on Sirius. Read full book review >
A SLIP OF THE KEYBOARD by Terry Pratchett
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Lit throughout by the bright star of wonder."
The celebrated creator of the Discworld series of fantasy novels offers an eclectic collection of pieces and speeches from as early as the 1970s. Read full book review >

THEATER OF CRUELTY by Ian Buruma
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A unique intelligence encounters the uniqueness of art and culture, and readers are the beneficiaries."
Buruma (Human Rights and Journalism/Bard Coll.; Year Zero: A History of 1945, 2013, etc.) presents a series of essays on a variety of cultural subjects— simmering below all: war and destruction. Read full book review >
INSURRECTIONS OF THE MIND by Franklin Foer
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"As this rich anthology shows, the debate over the meaning, viability and political effectiveness of liberalism continues—and not only in the pages of the New Republic."
What is liberalism? One magazine has grappled with that question for a century. Read full book review >
FINDING YOUR ROOTS by Henry Louis Gates Jr.
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"Primarily of interest to avid genealogy buffs."
The latest from redoubtable historian Gates (African-American Research/Harvard Univ.; Life Upon These Shores: Looking at African American History, 1513-2008, 2011, etc.) is not, despite the title, about finding your roots. A companion text to the popular PBS series, and following his similar Faces of America (2010), it's about finding the roots of 25 American notables of diverse ethnicity. Read full book review >
STUDY IN PERFECT by Sarah Gorham
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"A contemplative, lyrical, splendid collection."
Essays and musings considering the elusive and evocative idea of perfection. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 11, 2014

"Remarkable stories of love, sacrifice and survival."
A wide-ranging collection of essays centering on the author's Italian family members.Iodice (Future Shock 2.0, 2014, etc.) begins his book with the life story of his mother-in-law, Giovannina, who survived a Spanish flu epidemic and two world wars on the island of Ponza. Read full book review >
READ HARDER by Ed Park
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Hotly anticipated in 2020: The Believer's Read Hard with a Vengeance."
Nineteen essays, often funny and sometimes poignant, from the journalists, essayists and novelists long admired by the editors at McSweeney's Believer magazine. Read full book review >
HAPPINESS by Editors of n+1
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Sometimes-angry, always intelligent, deeply earnest, n+1, protesting against the glib, the slick and the trendy, is well-represented by this articulate collection."
The editors of the feisty literary journal celebrate their 10th anniversary with a collection. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >