Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews (page 8)

WE NEED SILENCE TO FIND OUT WHAT WE THINK by Shirley Hazzard
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A rich, urbane, insightful collection."
Masterful essays from an award-winning fiction writer. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A slight, breezy memoir that delves into serious subjects."
A dying mother puts a middle-aged humorist more in touch with his own mortality. Read full book review >

THE BOY WHO COULD CHANGE THE WORLD by Aaron Swartz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An important record of forward-looking thought cut short."
Collected writings of Aaron Swartz (1986-2013), prescient programmer and technology critic. Read full book review >
BEEN THERE, DONE THAT by Al Roker
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Sincere stories of life as working parents who value family above all else."
Well-known journalists Roker (The Storm of the Century: Tragedy, Heroism, Survival, and the Epic True Story of America's Deadliest Natural Disaster: The Great Gulf Hurricane of 1900, 2015, etc.) and Roberts team up to bring readers an intimate look into their family life.Read full book review >
WHERE WE BELONG by Hoda Kotb
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Occasionally inspiring but fatally uneven."
The Today show fourth hour co-anchor and Dateline NBC correspondent offers encouragement to those who are unfulfilled with their lives to break through the "gray clouds of frustration and worry" and "create a life that's both fun and rewarding."Read full book review >

Many Heads and Many Hands by Mau VanDuren
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Though informative, this book is in need of tighter structure and a more focused narrative to deliver on its intriguing premise."
From debut author VanDuren, an examination of how the evolution of Dutch law and government influenced the drafting of the U.S. Constitution. Read full book review >
Tao of Sustainability by Gregory Ripley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"An informative, well-presented application of traditional activities and philosophies to modern-day life."
Ripley (Primal Energy, 2014, etc.) offers a path back to nature in this philosophical work.Read full book review >
Bite Me by Laura Lefkowitz
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 20, 2015

"Witty stories about caring for animals that delicately balance comedy and pathos.
"
A collection of essays captures the unpredictable, demanding life of an emergency veterinarian. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 18, 2015

"The author brings a nuanced, wry perspective to the prison memoir genre."
A no-holds-barred account of life at several different levels of the American correctional system. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 18, 2015

"A tribute to humanity's inquisitive spirit and a useful guidebook for readers looking for a little inspiration or purpose."
An exploration of man's evolving search for answers, featuring short profiles of historically influential theologians, philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians. Read full book review >
THE CITY AT THREE P.M. by Peter LaSalle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"An up-and-down collection of essays on what a fiction writer does when he isn't writing fiction."
A collection of what could be called literary travel criticism. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"A comprehensive, detail-oriented guide to digital cinematography."
Mathias (Electronic Cinematography, 1985) offers perennial strategies for digital filmmaking in this guide.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >